Hi Teachers,

Could you tell, if the given synonyms are appropriate to 'mean' according to the context of the sentence? If not could you tell me a better one?

Oh, you mean that old lady whose husband died a few years ago?

a) insinuate

b) refer to

Thanks in advance
Not insinuate.

The style is casual; do is omitted. The complete form is "Oh, do you mean that old lady ...?"

do you mean? = are you referring to?

There are a number of other fairly synonymous expressions available to you, but unfortunately, they are all inferior for being so clumsy:

do you mean? =

do you intend to say?

are you making reference to?

are you indicating?

are you identifying?

CJ
Hi Jim,

Thank you for the reply. I didn't know about the possibilty of havig 'oh, do ...?'

I really makes sense.Emotion: wink

Best regards

TS
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Thinking SpainI didn't know about the possibility ...
Yes. In very casual conversations, we sometimes leave out the initial do or are when asking questions.

I heard you bought a new car. You like it? (Do you like it?)

There's a concert tomorrow night. You going? (Are you going?)

I recommend against students using these forms before they are well advanced in their studies of English!

CJ
Hi Jim,

Thanks for the additional explanation.

CalifJimI recommend against students using these forms before they are well advanced in their studies of English!
I'll do the same with my students, but not because they are well advanced in their studies,Emotion: embarrassed just because this is not proper English.Emotion: smile

Best,

TS
Does that mean you are going to change "You mean" to "Do you mean" in your text?

CJ
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Hi Jim,

I can't change it. There's a CD for this text. The short stories I ask about is different. Some of them are mine and some others are changed just because I don't like them. They are from the early 70's. But be sure I'll tell them about it.

Best regards,

TS
I just thought of a better explanation. It's a statement used as a question. Sometimes we just use the word order of a statement and change the intonation to make it a question.

So the good news is that you can avoid talking about omitted "do" entirely.

CJ
CalifJimI just thought of a better explanation. It's a statement used as a question. Sometimes we just use the word order of a statement and change the intonation to make it a question.
I though so too. I told you in an early post.Emotion: smile Though I wrote 'entonation' instead of 'intonation'.

TS
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