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I have chosen this subject for my lecture tonight because I think that most current discussions of politics and political theory take insufficient account of psychology. Economic facts, population statistics, constitutional organization, and so on, are set forth minutely. There is no difficulty in finding out how many South Koreans and how many North Koreans there were when the Korean War began. If you will look into the right books you will be able to ascertain what was their average income per head, and what were the sizes of their respective armies.

But if you want to know what sort of person a Korean is, and whether there is any appreciable difference between a North Korean and a South Korean; if you wish to know what they respectively want out of life, what are their discontents, what their hopes and what their fears; in a word, what it is that, as they say, "makes them tick", you will look through the reference books in vain. And so you cannot tell whether the South Koreans are enthusiastic about UNO, or would prefer union with their cousins in the North.

Nor can you guess whether they are willing to forgo land reform for the privilege of voting for some politician they have never heard of. It is neglect of such questions by the eminent men who sit in remote capitals, that so frequently causes disappointment. If politics is to become scientific, and if the event is not to be constantly surprising, it is imperative that our political thinking should penetrate more deeply into the springs of human action.

What is the influence of hunger upon slogans? How does their effectiveness fluctuate with the number of calories in your diet? If one man offers you democracy and another offers you a bag of grain, at what stage of starvation will you prefer the grain to the vote? Such questions are far too little considered. However, let us, for the present, forget the Koreans, and consider the human race.
All human activity is prompted by desire. There is a wholly fallacious theory advanced by some earnest moralists to the effect that it is possible to resist desire in the interests of duty and moral principle. I say this is fallacious, not because no man ever acts from a sense of duty, but because duty has no hold on him unless he desires to be dutiful. If you wish to know what men will do, you must know not only, or principally, their material circumstances, but rather the whole system of their desires with their relative strengths.

to be continued tomorrow.
This is part of an installment of Bertrand Russell's 1950 Nobel Lecture "What Desires Are Politically Important". The full text is at http://xahlee.org/Periodic dosage dir/ p2/russell-lecture.html

Xah
http://xahlee.org/PageTwo dir/more.html
I use the Dutch rule for what I suspect to ... we have little idea what the rules are over there.

there is no single romanization scheme for arabic.

And this is causing a lot of troubles with searches on transliterated names.

Personal accounts are good because they lessen the liability against future taxes of the retiree while sequestering the funds he's been paying in so they cannot be used to mask current general fund deficits.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Bill Bonde ('That he not busy being born')
there is no single romanization scheme for arabic.

And this is causing a lot of troubles with searches on transliterated names.

Has anyone written a Soundex system for Arabic names yet? The standard one is pretty much limited to the typical European phonetic repertoire.
Aaron Davies
Opinions expressed are solely those of a random number generator. "I don't know if it's real or not but it is a myth." -Jami JoAnne of alt.folklore.urban, showing her grasp on reality.
And I guess you are also using a rule of ... we have little idea what the rules are over there.

We know that Arabic doesn't even have capital letters.

Except in Texas . . .

Josh
All human activity is prompted by desire. There is a wholly fallacious theory advanced by some earnest moralists to the ... acts from a sense of duty, but because duty has no hold on him unless he desires to be dutiful.

I'm surprised to hear a philosopher as astute as Russel making such an obvious error using the same word, "desire," in two different senses.

Josh
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I use the Dutch rule for what I suspect to ... we have little idea what the rules are over there.

We know that Arabic doesn't even have capital letters.

But they do know about transliteration,
and probably have rules for it,
Jan
Yeah. Especially the toddlers padding around in their diapers, carrying their teddy bears.

happens when you go out and start wars.

Yep. Mess with us and we'll kill yer toddlers!
Should we put that on our coins?
\\P. Schultz
I think we should all be thankful that mankind used the bomb in WWII to end it as it did.

My, a new usage of 'mankind'. Could you count me out please?

Nope. We're all in this together. Mankind also
contributed lots of money to the tsunami victims,
and killed 6 million Jews in WWII, and invented
music, and slaughtered all the Neanderthals so we
could have Europe, and hosts a Miss Universe
Pageant every year. Yay, Mankind!!
\\P. Schultz
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
What it boils down to, apparently, is that others
must accept your logic, or else you will kill them.

Of course, many will think the same thing, but
their logic will not be yours.
So it's, like, a cockfight. That's your model of
human existence, eh?
You realize, I hope, how profoundly unoriginal,
yet how succintly put, your theory of political
economy is.
\\P. Schultz
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