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Hello everyone,

Are the sentences below okay?

1. I will love you all forever and beyond and I promise to go on guiding you even when I'm gone.

Teachers love never die.

2. We started with a simple hello but ended with a complicated goodbye hope you enjoyed the time.

3. Goodbye are only for those who love with their eyes but I love you all from the deep of my heart

4. So lucky and excited to have such a great teacher as John.

Kind regards,

Joseph

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1. I will love you all forever and beyond, and I promise to go on guiding you even when I'm gone. A teacher's love never dies.

2. We started with a simple hello but ended with a complicated goodbye. Hope you enjoyed the time. (or I hope ...)

3. Goodbyes are only for those who love with their eyes; I love you all from the deep depths of my heart.

4. (I am / We are) so lucky and excited to have such a great teacher as John.

CJ

Comments  
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CalifJimI love you all from the depths

Thanks a lot.

Why did you pluralize "depth"? Shouldn't it be "depth" as follows?

I love you all from the depth of my heart.

Regards,

Joseph

CalifJimThe idiom has "depths". "depth" is not wrong, but I've never heard it like that.
Thanks a lot.
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CalifJimA teacher's love never dies.

Excuse me CalifJim. I have another question. Could you please tell me if it is okay as well to say "Teachers' love never dies" in place of "A teacher's love never dies"?

PS. Could you please tell me what you call an annoying person like me in English😊? Because I often disturb the native speakers by asking them a lot of questions.

Joseph ACould you please tell me if it is okay as well to say "Teachers' love never dies" in place of "A teacher's love never dies"?

Yes, but as a native speaker, I would never say it like that. The problem is that when you speak, you don't say anything for the apostrophe, and "love" is an abstract noun without a plural, so the compound noun "teachers love" leaves us a little puzzled because the first component of a compound is so rarely plural. (Something like "teachers' duties" is more likely to sound all right to the native ear.)

Joseph ACould you please tell me what you call an annoying person like me in English😊?

You're not annoying, but we do get questions from people who really are annoying Emotion: smile

There are plenty of words for such people.

a pest is mild. a pain in the butt is strong. I rather like ding-dong and clueless (adj) at times.

A few more colorful ones:

He gives me a pain where a pill can't reach.
If he had another brain, it would be lonely.
I've got one nerve left, and he's getting on it.*

CJ

*from the more common expression He's getting on my nerves.

CalifJimYes, but as a native speaker, I would never say it like that. The problem is that when you speak, you don't say anything for the apostrophe, and "love" is an abstract noun without a plural, so the compound noun "teachers love" leaves us a little puzzled because the first component of a compound is so rarely plural. (Something like "teachers' duties" is more likely to sound all right to the native ear.)Joseph ACould you please tell me what you call an annoying person like me in English😊?You're not annoying, but we do get questions from people who really are annoying There are plenty of words for such people.a pest is mild. a pain in the butt is strong. I rather like ding-dong and clueless (adj) at times.A few more colorful ones:He gives me a pain where a pill can't reach.If he had another brain, it would be lonely.I've got one nerve left, and he's getting on it.*CJ*from the more common expression He's getting on my nerves.
Thanks a lot.
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