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person
number
gender
subject
subject & object
object
 
 
 
 
 
 
1st
sing.
mas.& fem
I
my*, mine**
me
 
plural
mas.& fem
we
our*, ours**
us
2nd
sing.
mas.& fem
thou
thy*, thine**
thee
 
sing.
mas.& fem
you
your*, yours**
you
 
plural
mas.& fem
you
your*, yours**
you
3rd
sing.
mas.
he
his*, his**
him
 
sing.
fem.
she
her*, hers**
her
 
sing.
neuter
it
its*, its**
it
 
plural
mas.,fem.,neu. 
they
their*, theirs**
them


Footnotes:

1: Boldfaced pronouns in the above chart are only used in poem. These pronouns are also used for God in Bible.

2: Pronouns having * as superscript always precede nouns to which they relate. e.g. In I love my country, my is followed by country because my relates to country.

3: Pronouns having ** as superscript are always preceded by nouns to which with they show relation or possession. e.g. In this book is mine mine is preceded by book.
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It looks fine to me. Nothing was boldface, but I assume that was the thou, thee line.

"Ye" is only used for certain expressions like "Oh ye of little faith" and you don't really need to worry about it.
Comments  
I hope you can understand my above table. Is that table correct? If it is, then where would you put ye in that table?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
 BarbaraPA's reply was promoted to an answer.
"Ye" is 2nd person plural or very formal 2nd person singular of Modern day "You." The word, "you" is its object. In modern English, the subject and object is "you" for both. Sometimes "ye" was used as an object, too as in "God rest ye merry gentleman." It still exists in use as the plural "you" today in some remote areas of Great Britain.

Example:

Ye shall pay for your insolence.

(this means, "You shall pay... or You guys shall pay...")

God uses this pronoun a lot in the bible when talking in 2nd person plural to his human subjects. We use "thou" to refer to God because the old rule does not say that "thou" is informal, but just 2nd person singular. The "thou" informal rule came about based on the "tu/vous" forms in French that castigated people for using it when speaking to someone whom they should have respect for. This, in essence, ostracized the word and it was relegated to only being used in the Bible and for humorous situation such as:

How art thou today?

Dost thou wish to talk about it?

I shall bid thee good day.

These three statements above are very common in MODERN ENGLISH when the interlocutor wishes to convey humor or sarcasm, perhap mockingly.