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Hello!

I would like to know something about the Tag-Questions. How do you know that a sentence makes more sense as a Tag-Question with a falling or a rising tag???

Example: We will have a final exam, won't we?

You are leaving for Montréal tomorrow, aren't you?

Also, I would like to know what to use to transform those 3 sentences into Tag-Questions:

1-English seems hard to many students, .... ?

2-English is easy for some students, .... ?

3-Carlos is from Mexico, doesn't he?( or: isn't he ?) ?

Thanks!
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Comments  
If the main verb you are tagging is a form of "to be", use that in the tag.

He is ..., isn't he?
I wasn't ..., was I?

If the main verb is a form of "to have" used as an auxiliary, use that in the tag.

They have gone already, haven't they?

If it is a modal verb, (can, could, will, would, shall, should, may, might, must), use that in the tag.

I could ..., couldn't I?
They shouldn't ..., should they?

In all other cases, use do in the tag.

French seems hard, doesn't it?
Paul and Mary sing well, don't they?
John and I don't like mathematics, do we?
We did the dishes, didn't we?
You had a good day, didn't you? ("had" is a form of "to have", but it is not an auxiliary here.)

CJ

I'll let others answer your other concerns.

I can't see the answer....
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Very comprehensive explanation. Thanks, CJ.
But I still don't know about the pronouciation... Where to put the accent?

How do you know that a sentence makes more sense as a Tag-Question with a falling or a rising tag???
But about the prononciation... How do you know that a sentence makes more sense as a Tag-Question with a falling or a rising tag??? I don't really know to distinct that.
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1. English seems hard to many students, doesn't it?

2-English is easy for some students, isn't it?

3-Carlos is from Mexico, isn't he?
Regarding "falling or rising":

If the whole sentence is truly a question (i.e., you don't know the answer), use rising intonation on the tag, the same as you use for any other kind of question.
If the whole sentence is merely a attempt to verify information you already know, or are fairly sure you know, or if you are simply reminding someone of a fact they probably already know, use falling intonation on the tag, as for a statement.

CJ
CalifJim You had a good day, didn't you? ("had" is a form of "to have", but it is not an auxiliary here.)

Is this AmE?
If I say: You had a good day, hadn't you? / You have three dogs, haven't you? this would be grammatically incorrect?
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