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Airplanes take us to cities around the world.


If I use 'bring' instead of 'take' here like:
Airplanes bring us to cities around the world.


does it still sound natural to you native speakers?
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Comments  
I would say the former one sounds more natural than the latter.
But still the latter is natural?
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To Taka,

Usually the verb "bring" is followed by the preposition "from". e.g.

a)
i) This flight usually BRINGS tourists FROM Japan.
ii) This flight usually TAKES tourists TO Japan.

b)
i) Please BRING my bag FROM my room.
ii) Please TAKE my bag TO my room.

The verb "take" can be followed by both "to" and "from". e.g.

i) Please TAKE me TO the airport.
ii) Please TAKE my luggage FROM the taxi.
Hello Temico

I don't like to offend you. But to me the examples below sound odd.
1) Please BRING my bag FROM my room.
2) Please TAKE my bag TO my room.

Google Results
1a) Please bring it from me .....0 hits
1b) Please take it from me .... 1580 hits
2a) Please bring it to me.......1080 hits
2b) Please take it to me.......... 38 hits

paco
Hello, Paco!

the second example you've mentioned doesn't sound odd to me; you could say that in a hotel for instance: "would you please take my bag to my room?"

For the first, I'm not so sure. I wouldn't say that, but rather "Could you please bring me the bag that's in my room?"

Wait and see, Emotion: smile
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Hello Pieanne

Yes, you are right. When you are outside of your room, you can tell to a bellboy "Bring my luggage from my room" or "Take this luggage to my room". And when you are inside of your room, you may say "Bring my luggage to this room" or "Take this luggage from here". That is, and

paco
Hi,
To me, they both sound natural.

'Bring' has the sense of 'in my direction', 'take' has the sense of 'away from me'.
For this reason, 'Airplanes bring ...' suggests to me that I might be one of the people who travels to these cities, wheas 'airplanes take ...' doesn't suggest that.

The word 'us' also suggests I'm involved in both examples, so that adds a little more 'me' into both these examples, even the 'take' one.

I hope I've explained my opinion clearly, to my mind it's a fairly subtle distinction.
Clive

PS I had a further thought. Perhaps a more obvious meaning suggested by 'bring' is that the speaker is already in one of the cities, and was probably brought by plane.
To Clive.
I hope I've explained my opinion clearly, to my mind it's a fairly subtle distinction.


Very clear, indeed!

So, what about 'Ariplanes bring us to the world'? Does it make sense? If I apply your theory, does it imply that the speaker is already international or something?
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