+0
England midfielder Steven Gerrard doesn't want to take fire away from Wayne Rooney but wants the striker to show referees respect as questions continue to be raised over his temperament ahead of the football World Cup opener.
Gerrard insisted that Rooney is well aware of his responsibilities on the pitch and that England supporters need not fear a repeat.
'Discipline is very important. I'm not sure if Wayne will be targeted, we'll see, but he is a very experienced player now. We need him on the pitch. Every player has been spoken to about discipline by the management,' Gerrard said.

Could you please explain to me what "take fire away from" means here?

Source : http://sify.com/news/gerrard-asks-rooney-to-check-his-language-news-international-kgkuuecjcge.html
+0
Is there any relation to the idiom "steal someone's thunder" do you suppose?

CJ
Comments  
At first I thought meant "deflect hostilities away from", but reading on, the full quote is "I don't want to take his fire away from him, he always plays on the edge which is why he's one of the best players in the world...", where clearly "I don't want to take his fire away from him" means "I don't want him to lose his passion and intensity".

It looks to me as if the writer has reused the words of that quote to invent a non-existent idiom "take fire away from". (Of course, if it is a known idiom then I am happy to be corrected.)
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
CalifJimIs there any relation to the idiom "steal someone's thunder" do you suppose?
Could be I guess, but it doesn't ring any bells with me...
Oh. So "to steal someone's thunder" is only AmE? Not BrE?

CJ
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
CalifJimOh. So "to steal someone's thunder" is only AmE? Not BrE?
No, sorry CJ, "steal someone's thunder" is familiar in BrE. What I meant was that "take fire away from someone" does not ring any bells as being related to it in any way.