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Does 'take off' simply mean to leave? Does it imply a sudden leave?

I heard people used the term at the end of a party, but not a sudden leave.

Thanks,

Cambridge: take off - to suddenly leave somewhere, usually without telling anyone that you are going
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Comments  (Page 2) 
That's interesting. I felt "take off" in the sense "depart abruptly" had a slightly older ring to it. Maybe it's been around for longer in the UK.

MrP
Hi MrP,

Then again, maybe it's just me who's been around a bit longer.

Clive
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
CliveGuy: Hey, baby, how about coming back to my place?

Girl: Take off !

I hear "buzz off!" from the girl...or worse.
Clive I imagine it's seldom said by the Queen of England.

She just thinks it in her mind, Clive...
Looks like a chaperone to me. Good thing, too.

Clive
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Davkett
Clive
Guy: Hey, baby, how about coming back to my place?

Girl: Take off !

I hear "buzz off!" from the girl...or worse.

(You're asking the wrong girls, D.)