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Is ‘take over’ below used as a transitive verb phrase (‘take over the flowers’) or an intransitive one? Or can it be taken either way?


Probably the hardest part about keeping a garden beautiful involves getting rid of weeds. If the weeds are not dealt with, they will take over and kill the flowers.


Additional question: Is there a good synonym for this ‘take over?’

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If the weeds are not dealt with, they will take over the garden and kill the flowers.

Additional question: Is there a good synonym for this ‘take over?

Yes.eg take control of the garden.

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Often as in this example, the context make it clear what is being taken over.

Comments  
Koji from JapanIs ‘take over’ below used as a transitive verb phrase (‘take over the flowers’) or an intransitive one?

Intransitive. In the transitive use, they will take over the garden, not the flowers. A dictator takes over. An army takes over an enemy country.

Koji from JapanOr can it be taken either way?

No.

Koji from JapanAdditional question: Is there a good synonym for this ‘take over?’

predominate

get the upper hand

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
 Clive's reply was promoted to an answer.

Thank you very much, Clive.

I understand well.