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For students it is "have / take an exam" or "sit an exam" but what about teachers?

Could it be "give an exam"?
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Hi,

For students it is "have / take an exam" or "sit an exam" In N. America, I hear mainly 'have'.

If you want to use 'sit', say 'sit for an exam'. This sounds to me like BrE, and rather formal.

but what about teachers? Could it be "give an exam"?

Yes. The teacher gave the students an exam.

The teacher set an exam for the students. This is in the sense of 'prepared'. The term seems a touch old-fashioned to me. I almost never hear it used.

Best wishes, Clive
Thank you, Clive.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
In the UK we would say "I have an exam to sit", or "I have to sit an exam".
TidusIn the UK we would say "I have an exam to sit", or "I have to sit an exam".

Are you talking about students, or both students and teachers?

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sit (EXAMINATION)

verb [T] sitting, sat, sat MAINLY UK
to take an examination:
After I've sat my exams, I'm going on holiday.

AUSTRALIAN ENGLISH I sat for my exams today.

(from Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary )
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Just students. Clive's reply takes care of the rest.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
I have a another question.
If we can say sit an exam,shall we sit anything others?For example,sit my work,sit my essay, etc...?Thanks!
Hi,

No. This way of using 'sit' is idiomatic and uncommon.

You can sit (on) a horse.

You can sit for a portrait.

Best wishes, Clive
Thank you very much , Clive!
However,"sit an exam" is an idiomatic usage,can we make "sit my work" to be an idiom,too?

HA-HA...... Pls don't laugh at my ludicrous question.Emotion: smile
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