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Hi

Two guys (who were observing a house of a certain lady) got back into a van and one of them said to the girl already sitting in there: Talk about your diamonds wrapped up in a tin can.

The girl replied: What do you mean?

The other one told her: What he means is the inside of that lady's humble abode hardly matches the outside. The furniture is all high-end, the paintings on the walls are real oils, a couple by artists I recognized, the rugs are authentic oriental, and she's got at least one sculpture that is museum quality.

Now, does the phrase "talk about" mean the same as "Let's talk about"?

Also: I suppose that the rest of that phrase is not any English idiom (diamonds wrapped up in a tin can)?

Thanks
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Now, does the phrase "talk about" mean the same as "Let's talk about"?-- No. 'Talk about':

used informally and often ironically to add emphasis to a statement: all his plays have such ridiculous plots — talk about good drama!


Also: I suppose that the rest of that phrase is not any English idiom (diamonds wrapped up in a tin can)?--Not an idiom, just a pair of metaphors, as 'the other one' explains: the outside of the house is cheap-looking ('a tin can'); the inside is opulent ('diamonds').
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Hi

Ok, I think I get it, but do you think the word "your" refers to the girl or has nothing to do with her?
It has nothing to do with her; it is a part of the fixed phrase, 'talk about your...'.
That's what I thought. Thanks!
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