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i wanna know what's the difference between these two words i'd really appreciete your help because i've read a lot different sentences like :

1.- don't speak that loud!
2.- don't talk so loud!

1.- i speak french
but i've never heard
2.- i talk french

that's my little tiny problem =(, so plz help me!!! so to speak =)
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Comments  
Hi,

When you are talking about the knowledge or use of language, use 'speak.'

> How many languages do you speak?

> I have to speak English in his class.

When you are on the phone, you should ask
==> Can I speak to Mr. Smith?
Hello, can somebody help with this one?

1.- don't speak that loud!
2.- don't talk so loud!
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Hello, can somebody help with this one?

1.- don't speak that loud!
2.- don't talk so loud!

Both say the same thing effectively.

1. Don't speak that loud! You are speaking too loud, and you shouldn't speak "that" loud (as loud as you are.)

2. Don't talk so loud. So is an an intensifier. See #6 here: http://www.hyperdictionary.com/dictionary/so

You are talking too loudly. Please don't talk SO loud.

They are equivalent. I would say that 2 is probably more common.

Hope that helps.
i wanna know is wrong.

It should be ' I wanna know'.

i'd really is wrong.
It should be I'd really ....

i have read a lot of different is wrong.
It shold be I have a read a lot of different...
Thank you, MountainHiker!

I have some question

1. When the teacher came in, all students stopped talking. (correct)
2. When the teacher came in, all students stopped speaking. (sounds weird, but I don't tell why)
3. On the phone, we say "Can I speak to your mom?" I do think there is some situation when we can use "Can I talk to your mom?", right? 'speak to' sounds like more of a one-way communication or exchanges in more serious situations. 'talk to' refers to more conversational exchanges.
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1. When the teacher came in, all students stopped talking. (correct-yes)

2. When the teacher came in, all students stopped speaking. (sounds weird, but I don't tell why)

I agree, sounds a bit odd. Talking sounds more conversational.

3. On the phone, we say "Can I speak to your mom?" Yes, you can.

I do think there is(are) some situation(s) when we can use "Can I talk to your mom?", right?
Speak to' sounds like more of a one-way communication or exchanges in more serious situations. 'talk to' refers to more conversational exchanges.

I agree with your comments. Speak has a more formal tone. Talk is more conversational.

If you are angry at someone, "I want to speak to you!"

If you are just having a normal conversation, "I want to talk to you about our plans for this weekend."

To my ear, "speak" has a slightly more formal tone to it.
How dare you talk to me like that?

> This sentence makes me think the situdation could happen between two friends or just two persons, and the relationship between them should be good or their social status may be somewhat equal.

How dare you speak to me like that?

> I would say the relationship between the two people is somewhat unequal, presumably one of them is considered to be superior (the one who uttered this sentence)

How dare you speak to teacher like that?

> It implies student shoudn't speak to teacher in a rude way. The hierarchy bwteen student and teacher is obvious.

How dare you talk to teacher like that?

> I would think that student talk BACK to their teachers in a rude way. Or that student developes a good relationship with his teacher, just like friends. So the student usually talks to his teacher in somewhat buddy-buddy style.

Am I right?
Pastel,

I am going to repeat your text and number them.

#1
How dare you talk to me like that?

> This sentence makes me think the situdation could happen between two friends or just two persons, and the relationship between them should be good or their social status may be somewhat equal.

#2
How dare you speak to me like that?

> I would say the relationship between the two people is somewhat unequal, presumably one of them is considered to be superior (the one who uttered this sentence)

#3
How dare you speak to teacher like that?

> It implies student shoudn't speak to teacher in a rude way. The hierarchy bwteen student and teacher is obvious.

#4
How dare you talk to teacher like that?

> I would think that student talk BACK to their teachers in a rude way. Or that student developes a good relationship with his teacher, just like friends. So the student usually talks to his teacher in somewhat buddy-buddy style.


I would agree with 1 and 2. But I think it is pretty subtle. It is said during the "heat of battle" and I am not sure that the person will use the correct word to reflect social status. I think this is somewhat pedantic, as different people will use different words (speak, talk) just because of their normal speech pattern. They won't necessarily follow the "rule".

#3 and #4 need a little work.

How dare you talk to the teacher like that? "The" might be "a".

THE

You spoke rudely to Ms. Henderson, and now the principal is giving you heck.

A

If you are using foul language, the principal is disgusted that you are speaking to any teacher like that.

It is somewhat harder to address 3 and 4. There is an implied heirachy between teacher and student. So when you have "How dare you..." it is already assumed that you have done something you should not have done to someone in a superior position.

I think technically your assumptions are correct. But pragmatically, I think people will use the word (either talk or speak) they use most often.

Does that help?
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