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When Chris Marris, a young teacher, (1) came to Queensmill in 1982, he was astonished by Stephen's drawings.

Marris (2) had been teaching/had tought(teach) disabled children for nine years, but nothing he (3) saw (see) (4) had prepared/prepared (prepare) him for Stephen.

`When I first (5) saw (see) him, Stephen (6) was sitting(sit) on his own in the corner of the room, drawing ,'Chris told me. 'He was absolutely amazing. He(7)would draw (draw) and draw and draw - the school (8) called/used to call (call) him "the drawer". And he (9) ..........................(produce) these most unchildlike drawings, like 's and , in tremendous detail when other children his age (10) ....................(draw) stick figures.

I think the verbs from 1 to 8 are put in the right tense.Is "prepared" in the 4th position wrong?

I am puzzled about (9) and (10). Depending on the meaning of when I could choose a different tense.

If "when=while at the same time", we should have (9) produced (10) were drawing

If "when=while on the contrary" we should have (9) produced (10) would draw or would be drawing.

Am I totally wrong?
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This is how I see it:

When Chris Marris, a young teacher, (1) came to Queensmill in 1982, he was astonished by Stephen's drawings. Marris (2) had been teaching disabled children for nine years, but nothing he (3) had seen (4) had prepared him for Stephen.

`When I first (5) saw him, Stephen (6) was sitting on his own in the corner of the room, drawing,' Chris told me. 'He was absolutely amazing. He(7)would draw and draw and draw - the school (8) called him "the drawer". And he (9) would produce these most unchildlike drawings, like St Paul's and Tower Bridge, in tremendous detail when other children his age (10) were drawing stick figures.
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Mister MicawberThis is how I see it:

When Chris Marris, a young teacher, (1) came to Queensmill in 1982, he was astonished by Stephen's drawings. Marris (2) had been teaching disabled children for nine years, but nothing he (3) had seen (4) had prepared him for Stephen.

`When I first (5) saw him, Stephen (6) was sitting on his own in the corner of the room, drawing,' Chris told me. 'He was absolutely amazing. He(7)would draw and draw and draw - the school (8) called him "the drawer". And he (9) would produce these most unchildlike drawings, like St Paul's and Tower Bridge, in tremendous detail when other children his age (10) were drawing stick figures.

Why do you think "would draw or would be drawing." are wrong?

This use of 'would' (for characteristic behaviour) is meant in this passage to highlight Stephen's peculiarities, so it is distracting when used of the other children-- it detracts from the focus on Stephen's actions.