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Hi

1. However sometimes the overall net profit of the company can be positive and one of the divisions can have negative income as the division generated losses.

2. However sometimes the overall net profit of the company can be positive and one of the divisions can have negative income as the division may have generated losses.

Thanks,

MG.
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Hi,

Which one of the following sentences sounds better?

1. However sometimes overall net profit of the company can be positive and one of the divisions can have negative income as the division generated losses.



2. However sometimes overall net profit of the company can be positive and one of the divisions can have negative income as the division may have generated losses.



Neither sounds good to me, because 'can have' suggests only possibility.

I prefer this.

However, sometimes the overall net profit (<<< surely 'profit' is always positive? Do you mean 'overall net income'?) of the company can be positive and one of the divisions can have a negative income if it has generated losses.



Clive
Comments  
I think both of those sound fine. I would make the small amendments below:

However, sometimes the overall net profit of the company can be positive, and one of the divisions can have negative income, because that division generated losses.

However, sometimes the overall net profit of the company can be positive, and one of the divisions can have negative income, because that division may have generated losses.
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Musicgold
1. However sometimes the overall net profit of the company can be positive and one of the divisions can have negative income as the division generated losses.
2. However sometimes the overall net profit of the company can be positive and one of the divisions can have negative income as the division may have generated losses.
Perhaps, this is my interpetation from the angle where I stand. To me, in business terms, people would refer to revenues, incomes and positive financial aspects to "generate", and loss, debts and expenses etc to "incur". I think some of the words and terms used in the above sentences don't quite snugly fit , nor sound smooth. A company's net profit (meaning after paying all its creditors, suppliers and financial obligations) to me is the bottom-botom line.

This said, I think this sentence leaves the reader wondering what it really means, at least to me anyway: " .....the overall net profit of the company can be positive and one of the divisions can have negative income as the division generated losses.

This term troubles me from the English point of view: Negative income. Doesn't it mean a "net loss"?