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Hi guys!!!

In these sentences:

"I'm taller than he"

"I'm taller than he is"

"I'm taller than him."

1) Are all of them gramatically correct?

2) Is any of them more formal than the others?

3) Which one is more used in spoken English?

I will appareciate your valuable answers.

Thanks
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The first one I believe was used a long time ago. The last two are correct and probably used to an equal extent. I would say the second one is slightly more formal than the third. (Only slightly though).
Search for

"taller than he"
(quotation marks are important)
at this site (upper right corner search box)

and you will find lots of threads such as:
http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/TallerTaller/bqjzj/Post.htm
http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/SomeoneAndMe/hlxm/Post.htm

The traditional/formal view is taller than he
as described in Garner, Modern American Usage, at than.
However, Garner points out that Partridge or Safire were for than him.

Still a big fight.
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Marius Hancuand you will find lots of threads such as:
http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/TallerTaller/bqjzj/Post.htm
http://www.EnglishForward.com/English/SomeoneAndMe/hlxm/Post.htm
People seldom use the search function before asking a question... (And sometimes I am not an exception. Emotion: embarrassed)
I know than him is the most common in daily speaking and among the people,i hereby generally use than him. My teacher who is from chicago also says than him.

One day while i looked up the dictionary for another word, i found than he is as it happens. The dictionary (Longman Active Study, from english to english) says than he is. If you ask me than he is more formal than than him.

But don't forget that you also should consider which is spoken more in daily.
I was listening to the sound track from Wicked over the weekend, and in the song Popular, the more formal phrasing is used: "Whenever I meet someone less popular than I."

I do use the nominative case when I THINK about it (which is why I'm a grammar geek) but in casual spoken English, I'll use "than me," as do most people.
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In British English, you very seldom hear "taller than he"; "taller than he is" and "taller than him" are much more common.

If you were assessing the relative height of two women, for instance, for some mysterious purpose of your own, you might point at each in turn and say:

1. She's taller than her.

but it might strike onlookers as odd if you said:

2. She's taller than she.

MrP
If perfection is what you're after, you should choose "She is smarter than he is" or the admittedly stiff "She is smarter than he."

That's because in formal English, "than" is regarded as a conjunction and not a preposition, so the following pronoun is in the nominative case – "he," not "him."
Although you may hear it more often, and is also commonly used, it is still grammatically incorrect to use the object pronoun. It sounds strange because few people use it correctly.

Just like many people don't use the past perfect tense when they should. It's common because most people don't know the rule and don't recognize the mistake when they hear it.
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