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hi, please read the following sentence: "In fact, we have learned that we have a much greater effect on an individual or population if we work as a team in a system of care that is supported by evidence that what we are doing is effective."

According to my understanding, it seems to be some sort of tautological saying: "we have a much greater effect...if we work as a team...supported by evidence that what we are doing is effecitve." Am I wrong? Can anyone help me to figure out what's going on?

thks!
Comments  
I see what you mean. I think it has a reading in which it is tautological, but I doubt that was the intended meaning. The intended meaning, in my opinion, is something like this:

We have a much greater success rate if we work in a system that can monitor whether our actions are effective.

That is, we continue to do better if there is way by which we can know if we are doing better.

CJ
Thank you for giving me another angle to read this sentence, CJ. Your reading seems to focus on the monitoring "system". But reading from the context (I am sorry that I haven't quoted a larger context), the focus seems to be on "team work". The whole paragraph goes like this: "We [physicans] must also learn to work well in a team of health workers. The job of improving health and healing disease is a big one that cannot be accomplished by any one doctor. In fact, we have learned that we have a much greater effect on an individual or population if we work as a team in a system of care that is supported by evidence that what we are doing is effective. This has been a hard lesson to learn, as physicians are trained to believe taht they are healers, following in the footsteps of their teachers or on the strength of their experience."

Does it help?
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
You don't want to have both effect and effective this close to each other ....
(system of care) that is supported by evidence that what we are doing is effective

certainly is difficult to comprehend in this context. Upon rereading it, I'm not quite sure what to make of it. Maybe the original draft had several alternatives for expressing the thought and these were hastily combined somehow in the final draft, giving the strange phrases we see here.

We have evidence / data / results of measurements, presumably.
This data shows that "what we are doing" -- whatever it may be -- is effective.
And this evidence / data also supports a system of care.

I don't think evidence can support a system of care. Evidence normally supports some sort of hypothesis or claim.

It's a puzzling structure, and that's about all we can say without a conversation with the author, I suppose.
Maybe others will see the intended meaning better than I.

CJ
KeroroThank you for giving me another angle to read this sentence, CJ. Your reading seems to focus on the monitoring "system". But reading from the context (I am sorry that I haven't quoted a larger context), the focus seems to be on "team work". The whole paragraph goes like this: "We [physicans] must also learn to work well in a team of health workers. The job of improving health and healing disease is a big one that cannot be accomplished by any one doctor. In fact, we have learned that we have a much greater effect on an individual or population if we work as a team in a system of care that is supported by evidence that what we are doing is effective. This has been a hard lesson to learn, as physicians are trained to believe taht they are healers, following in the footsteps of their teachers or on the strength of their experience."

Does it help?

(system of care) that is supported by evidence that what we are doing is effective

certainly is difficult to comprehend in this context. Upon rereading it, I'm not quite sure what to make of it. Maybe the original draft had several alternatives for expressing the thought and these were hastily combined somehow in the final draft, giving the strange phrases we see here.

We have evidence / data / results of measurements, presumably.
This data shows that "what we are doing" -- whatever it may be -- is effective.
And this evidence / data also supports a system of care.

I don't think evidence can support a system of care. Evidence normally supports some sort of hypothesis or claim.

It's a puzzling structure, and that's about all we can say without a conversation with the author, I suppose.
Maybe others will see the intended meaning better than I.


I think that "evidence" could relate to follow-up studies of recovery rates, customer satisfaction surveys, general well-being surveys, etc. In other words, the "evidence" might consist of (statistical) comparisons of patients who were treated with "teamwork" versus patients who were treated by an individual doctor in the traditional mode.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
(system of care) that is supported by evidence that what we are doing is effective

I think this sentence (if we can call it that) can’t stand on the words that made it up. The first impression (that's after reading it a few times) to me was, it sounded like a riddle. Too many “thats” and not enough “evidence”.
Keroro
Thank you for giving me another angle to read this sentence, CJ. Your reading seems to focus on the monitoring "system". But reading from the context (I am sorry that I haven't quoted a larger context), the focus seems to be on "team work". The whole paragraph goes like this: "We [physicans] must also learn to work well in a team of health workers. The job of improving health and healing disease is a big one that cannot be accomplished by any one doctor. In fact, we have learned that we have a much greater effect on an individual or population if we work as a team in a system of care that is supported by evidence that what we are doing is effective. This has been a hard lesson to learn, as physicians are trained to believe taht they are healers, following in the footsteps of their teachers or on the strength of their experience."

Does it help?

how about breaking it into two parts: the claim is "we have a much greater effect on an individual or population if we work as a team in a system of care" and we have evidence to support this claim, that is, what we are doing is effective.