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Is there any place for teaching grammar in a formal mannar? I need examples also...please help me...thanks
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Could you be more specific about what you are looking for?
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Welcome to EF, mkeskus! Are you Finnish? I can be as formal as you want me to but unfortunately I don't always have the time to write long comprehensive posts. What exactly is it that you are looking for?
CB
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
I am a student in Tesol. In one of my tasks I am asked this question. Im having trouble in answering.

" Knowing a language is not just a matter of having grammatical 'competence' ........ We have seen that we also need to add communicative competence - that is the understanding of what language is appropriate within certain situations."'The Practice of English Language Teaching' Harmer

Is there any place for teaching grammar in a formal manner? Give reasons for your answer.
Hi was just reading your posting on the english forum, i must be doing the same tefol course, as I am busy working on the exact same essay. I am also having trouble in answering this essay type question - do you have any recommendations

kind regards
I think that what you are looking for is experience in actually using a language. Knowledge of the grammar of a language is useful, but it can make a person seem too 'bookish'. A second language learner needs practice in chatting with people who use the language as a first language. If actually speaking is not practical for some reason, then the internet is a good substitute. You can chat on a forum, or just read the forums and newspapers available on-line.

For the benefit of anyone who is actually teaching, here is a good communicative competence resource:
http://www.nclrc.org/essentials/goalsmethods/goal.htm
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Ttate:

Welcome to the forums. This is a very interesting subject!
Languages do have a formal grammar, but also there are many times when the rules are broken by native speakers in actual practice. Sometimes "formal speech," although grammatically correct, sounds stilted and contrived in a casual conversation. Sometimes the word order, emphasis, and tone can change the meaning of a sentence or phrase.

Languages are living; they evolve over time - vocabulary, pronunciation, and even grammar changes. Not only do they change over time, but they change with geography and even social class. Knowing a language well is like is knowing the people who speak it, with their history, poetry, nuances and foibles.
AlpheccaStarsTtate:

Languages are living; they evolve over time - vocabulary, pronunciation, and even grammar changes. Not only do they change over time, but they change with geography and even social class. Knowing a language well is like is knowing the people who speak it, with their history, poetry, nuances and foibles.

Thanks for the welcome.
I agree about languages evolving. The only languages that don't evolve are dead ones. I also agree about 'knowing the people', in the sense of knowing the society and its culture. These are some of the linguistics topics I write about in my blog.
This question sounds a bit too general to me. I think I should try to learn what I should say in almost all situations. There are no shortcuts; grammar is important, vocabulary is important, every aspect of the language is important. At first, I was digging into what i thought was the most important things, but later I found details very important. And I'm still trying to figure out in which way I can improve my English further. But there is one thing I think I should always stick to-that is to be attentive to details.

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