re: Teenagers page 6

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Django Cat filted:
On the right is the girl (she was our Homecoming queen),

What *is* that? I can't believe I haven't used this forum to ask about what a Homecoming Queen is before, given I've been wondering since... when did 'Daydream Believer' come out? Please put an end to decades of speculation..

You've had the straightforward answer...here's what happens when someone takes a familiar cultural phenomenon and gives it a twist:

http://www.guntheranderson.com/v/data/thehomec.htm

..r
(Tony: BRHS? What's the "BR" for? Bull Run?)

Broad Ripple High School. I spelled it out earlier in the thread, but figured that either the initials or the name would be equally unimportant in later references.

"Broad Ripple"? Hey, I went to Bimbo Thunderbird High! My little cousin attends Ho-Craic Middle School.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
R H Draney wrote, in part:

...here's what happens when
someone takes a familiar cultural phenomenon and gives it a twist: http://www.guntheranderson.com/v/data/thehomec.htm

Is this a real song? Did you ever hear it?
If it weren't for the gun and the killings, it would be rather funny. If you know what I mean.
Maria Conlon
I'll stick with "negro community" in that context. That's what they were: negro communities. They weren't black communities, or African-American communities.

They weren't "negro communities" either. They were maybe "Negro communities". Lowercasing "negro" in 1945 was similar to lowercasing "Jew" (then or today).

Steny '08!
Broad Ripple High School. I spelled it out earlier in ... or the name would be equally unimportant in later references.

"Broad Ripple"? Hey, I went to Bimbo Thunderbird High! My little cousin attends Ho-Craic Middle School.

BRHS was built in 1886. The area was called Broad Ripple because the ripple in White River was the largest and the widest at this point. It was so wide that only one person was known to be able to throw a stone across the river at that point.
There are a number of distinguishing features about the senior class of 1956: only one girl dropped out because she was pregnant, only one member is known (by me) to have been sentenced to hard time in prison, one girl was invited to the Senior Prom because her leg was in a full cast and her date Emotion: it wasnt me asked her because he didn't like to dance, and only one member of the class is a regular poster to aue.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
It's always an interesting choice in writing about the past ... reflect what the community would call itself in those days.

Never easy. I noted that when you used 'negro' you qualified it by saying " (the term used then) ". ... far as I can see, there isn't even transpondial agreement among black people on what they prefer to be called.

Yeah. One almost gets the feeling that these people don't really form a coherent "group" at all.
Start a campaign ro make contributing membership a requirement for parole.
"Broad Ripple"? Hey, I went to Bimbo Thunderbird High! My little cousin attends Ho-Craic Middle School.

BRHS was built in 1886. The area was called Broad Ripple because the ripple in White River was the largest ... wide that only one person was known to be able to throw a stone across the river at that point.

Yes, yes, of course! Bimbo Thunderbird was named for the Pan-Bimbo Group (the Wonder of Mexico)* who sponsered this magnet school back in the 80s. The "Thunderbird" (eg, the California Condor) was our mascot.
Ho Craic Middle School is named for the noted Iro-Chinaman Patrick Ho, who started a lively weekly discussion group on its grounds back in the early part of the last century. Think an Algonquin Round Table for cheeky Celts.
*
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
I wasn't around at that time either, but I'm surprised at the suggestion that polite usage of the time would have been to write "Negro" without capitalization.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary of 1913, under its entry for "Negro," uses the word without capitalization:
See
http://machaut.uchicago.edu/cgi-bin/WEBSTER.sh?WORD=negro
Such a usage in a major unabridged dictionary would likely represent what was generally considered to be polite usage in 1913.

MWCD11 dates "zoot suit" to 1942 and "bobby-soxer" to 1944, so I take it that represents the period which we are discussing.

Someone with access to newspaper archives of the time could get a better idea of what was generally considered to be polite usage of the time. I'll limit myself to citing a Web page which quotes a columnist from a few years earlier.
From
http://list.msu.edu/cgi-bin/wa?A2=ind0209c&L=aejmc&F=&S=&P=3776
George S. Schuyler, a black conservative, wrote the following in his column "View and Reviews," *The Pittsburgh Courier,* on November 7, 1936 (page 10):
"Will somebody who is capable of thinking explain what difference it makes whether Negro is spelled with a capital 'N' or not? ... Maybe it is perfectly all right to insist on capitalization of Negro while remaining quietly in bondage."
It seems to me that this indicates that leaders of the African-American community of the time were objecting to the word "Negro" being presented without capitalization, and I would not be surprised at all if by 1942 most American newspapers printed the word with a capital.
I suspect that we do have a number of African-American ... a truly diverse newsgroup, without of course sacrificing posting quality.

So, recruit. Go post some invitations in newsgroups that are likely to have African-American contributors.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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