re: Teenagers page 7

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Yes; the same pattern, the words for 11 & 12 being exceptional, is found in Gothic, Old English, and Old Norse, and persists in their modern descendants, including Dutch and Icelandic beside those already mentioned.

Then, we can ask why these numbers are excepted. A remnant of an old duodecimal system?

Per Erik Rønne
R H Draney wrote, in part: ...here's what happens when

someone takes a familiar cultural phenomenon and gives it a twist: http://www.guntheranderson.com/v/data/thehomec.htm

Is this a real song? Did you ever hear it? If it weren't for the gun and the killings, it would be rather funny. If you know what I mean. Maria Conlon

Indeed, nice bit of zeitgeist surfing - who's Julie Brown?

Love that 'acrobatic/instamatic' rhyme - 'Instamatic' very cleverly roots the song in the back a way...
DC
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
The zoot suit came about in the 40s in the American negro (the term used then) communities.

The term was "colored people" in WAmE of the 40s and 50s. I'm not sure what the equivalent BAmE term was back then, although I know at least some Blacks also spoke of "colored people", even among themselves. There has never been a NAAN, AFAIK.

Charles Riggs
They are no accented letters in my email address
Sounds like the tradition is a thing of the past?

Aren't they all?

No, thank goodness. Some are even getting better: a woman opened a door for me Saturday, in keeping with the honored tradition of men doing same for them. If that becomes part of the tradition, I think people will date its beginnings to late 19th century. I'd know more about Irish women's habits of that time, so I'd not be the best person to describe how American women of the 1990s behaved.
Charles Riggs
They are no accented letters in my email address
I find it easy to refer to the "African-Americans of the 40s"

Easy, but wrong. "African-Americans", as a term, did not exist in the 40s. You can't use it anymore than you can talk about the "Irish" of
300 AD.
or the "black Americans of the 40s"

I think that is the best choice. "Black" works, regardless of the time. "American Negro" is another possibility.

Charles Riggs
They are no accented letters in my email address
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
R H Draney wrote, in part: ...here's what happens when

someone takes a familiar cultural phenomenon and gives it a twist: http://www.guntheranderson.com/v/data/thehomec.htm

Is this a real song?

As opposed to...?

Charles Riggs
They are no accented letters in my email address
It evolved from what might then have been called the "Negro community", yes. Prove it. Prove that it wasn't a simultaneous development.

Nonsense. You prove differently.

He doesn't have to. See Raymond's post.

Charles Riggs
They are no accented letters in my email address
I find it easy to refer to the "African-Americans of the 40s"

Easy, but wrong. "African-Americans", as a term, did not exist in the 40s. You can't use it anymore than you can talk about the "Irish" of 300 AD.

First, in the 1940s there were American citizens whose ancestors had come from sub-Sahara Africa and who were of the group (a sociological "race" if not a biological one) which had long been identified as "Negroes." Such people can be called "African-American" today and it seems perfectly reasonable to refer to them as "African-American" when speaking of the 1940s. The fact that there were probably relatively few people who favored the term at the time is irrelevant. I doubt that "Romany" would have been considered an English word in the 1940s, but I see no reason why we could not use "Romany" to refer to the group who would have been called "Gypsies" (or "gypsies") at the time.
Second, "African-American" is not a modern coining. MWCD11 dates "African-American" to 1854 (and "Afro-American to 1853), and it would have been perfectly understandable if someone in the 19th century had referred to an "African-American" or "Afro-American," especially if that person were in the habit of referring to other "hyphenated American." (Similarly, for those people who avoided the terms using a hyphen, so that an "Italian-American" would have been referred to by such people as an "Italian," there was the term "African," which had at least some positive use in the 1800s when referring to black Americans: Among other things, there are historically black churches, carrying a name containing the term "African," which were founded back then.)
or the "black Americans of the 40s"

I think that is the best choice. "Black" works, regardless of the time. "American Negro" is another possibility.

The use of "black" reflects the modern acceptability of the term. There were times when an African-American would have been insulted to have been called "black," and I believe that the 1940s was one such time. If you're going to base which term you use on what was used at the time which you appear to be doing with "African-American," then you should avoid "black" even more strongly than you do "African-American" when making reference to American Negroes of the 1940s.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Nonsense. You prove differently.

He doesn't have to. See Raymond's post.

I will say this: If I were to refer to the African-American community back at the time that the term "negro" was generally written without a capital which, as I said previously, I suspect was prior to the 1940s I would use scare quotes: "the 'negro' community."

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
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