I wonder if other languages than English have the word "teenager" and the associated concepts.
In English (I'm presuming now) it's formed from the suffix "teen" on the words for the numbers 13-19 inclusive, but in other languages (eg French, Italian) the patterns don't persist past 16. In German you get "zehn" on the end, but are there "Zehnsteren"?
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Chrissy
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I wonder if other languages than English have the word "teenager" and the associated concepts. In English (I'm presuming now) ... French, Italian) the patterns don't persist past 16. In German you get "zehn" on the end, but are there "Zehnsteren"?

You can get words in multiple languages by going to machine-translation programs like Google/Language Tools, or www.worldlingo.com .

I think you'll find it doesn't happen in many languages - meaning, they certainly have a word that means "teenager," but it doesn't resemble the numbers. But it does happen to hold true in Dutch, which uses "-tien" in numbers and calls such a person a "tien" or 'tiener".

Best Donna Richoux
chrissy schrieb:
I wonder if other languages than English have the word "teenager" and the associated concepts. In English (I'm presuming now) ... French, Italian) the patterns don't persist past 16. In German you get "zehn" on the end, but are there "Zehnsteren"?

In German, there aren't.
We either use your word "teenager" or our own "Jugendliche" (youths), which are older than "Kinder" (children). The phrase "Kinder und Jugendliche" is quite common. Legally, "Jugendliche" are 14-17 years old, but in common usage, the age boundaries can be extended beyond that somewhat.
Another way to characterize age groups is as in sports: the U20 group contains people under 20. Similarly U30 etc.
A coinage similar to what you seek is "Mittzwanziger" (mid-twenty-er), describing a person of around 25 years of age, give or take a few years. Similarly for 30, 40 etc., but not for 10.
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Michael

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I wonder if other languages than English have the word "teenager" and the associated concepts. In English (I'm presuming now) ... French, Italian) the patterns don't persist past 16. In German you get "zehn" on the end, but are there "Zehnsteren"?

The term "teenager" is becoming universal partly because other languages don't have a similar term. But I think most other countries don't get that teenagerdom/teenagerhood only starts at 13, and take it to mean any child in double digits.
Adrian
I wonder if other languages than English have the word "teenager" and the associated concepts. In English (I'm presuming now) ... French, Italian) the patterns don't persist past 16. In German you get "zehn" on the end, but are there "Zehnsteren"?

There is a sizeable literature on the development of the concept "teenager" in sociology, especially of the softer or popular kind. The concept is usually assigned to the mid-1950s and to the United States. Either because the same forces that led to the development of the concept in the US operate elsewhere or because of American cultural hegemony, almost every language and culture now knows of teenagers.

German has "Teenager."
Italian has "teen-ager."
Japanese has "tineja."
Most languages have an "adolescent" or "youth" equivalent, sometimes specialized to the concept "teenager":
Jugenliche, Heranwachsende (German)
adolescente (Spanish)
adolescente (Italian)
jeune, adolescent (French)
podrostok, yenosha (Russian)
qingshaonian (Chinese)
In English (I'm presuming now) it's formed from the suffix "teen" on the words for the numbers 13-19 inclusive, but in other languages (eg French, Italian) the patterns don't persist past 16. In German you get "zehn" on the end, but are there "Zehnsteren"?

Polish does have a good equivalent - "nastolatek". The "nasto-" part comes from an inflected form of "-nas'cie", which corresponds to the English "teen" in numbers. "-latek" is derived from the equivalent of "years". However, the whole word seems to be simply the part that words meaning 11-year-old to 19-year-old have in common, i.e. -teen-year-old.

That must sound complicated, so the short answer is - Polish has such a word based on the same concept. Emotion: smile
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Adam
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In English (I'm presuming now) it's formed from the suffix ... you get "zehn" on the end, but are there "Zehnsteren"?

Polish does have a good equivalent - "nastolatek". The "nasto-" part comes from an inflected form of "-nas'cie", which corresponds ... must sound complicated, so the short answer is - Polish has such a word based on the same concept. Emotion: smile

The difference is that the English word covers a period that is more closely aligned with the period ranging from the typical start of puberty to the typical end of growth for males. If 11 and 12 in English had words ending in "teen," would our cultural view of teenagers be different? Girls tend to mature earlier, and typically stop growing closer to age 16. Yet a 19 year old woman would be classified as an adult but would also be included in teenage pregnancy statistics in the US.
There is a sizeable literature on the development of the concept "teenager" in sociology, especially of the softer or popular kind. The concept is usually assigned to the mid-1950s and to the United States.

Hmm. I myself became a teenager in 1948 and I can't recall the term "teenager" being in use at that time. I think it wasn't, which is a mild surprise. Some aspects of teenage culture definitely began earlier; I'm thinking of shrieking girls at Frank Sinatra concerts in the early 40s.

John Varela
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There is a sizeable literature on the development of the ... usually assigned to the mid-1950s and to the United States.

Hmm. I myself became a teenager in 1948 and I can't recall the term "teenager" being in use at that ... aspects of teenage culture definitely began earlier; I'm thinking of shrieking girls at Frank Sinatra concerts in the early 40s.

There were young people then who were called
something like "Bobbysoxers". I do not know whether they were always female, but I think the Sinatra fans were and I think they wore shoes called "saddle oxfords". A male variation might have been the ones called "Zootsuiters".
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