excuse me for reposting this post.

Would you tell me the name of this grammar, the underlined part? so I can google and learn it.

After a job was finished, we'd stand on the street drinking beer or foul-tasting Gatorade. The tip would be discussed, as would the disadvantages of living in this particular neighborhood.

Thank you,

M
Dear M

The "as" here is working as a correlative conjunction (you will find it on the web if you google it)

Basically, it is acting like "and", to join two nouns or noun phrases together. In this case: the tip and the disadvantages..

- When we had finished a job, we talked about (a) the tip; and (b) the disadvantages of the neighbourhood

- The tip was talked about, as were the disadvantages of the neighbourhood

Hope this helps, Dave
mitsuwao23the name of this grammar
Subject-verb inversion after 'as'.

CJ
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Thank you for your help, always.

Still a bit confused but googling worked and I think I got the main idea.

Just to make sure, does this subject-verb inversion with as occur based on any logical reason? or is this more like a idiomatic expression?

Thank you,

m
mitsuwao23does this subject-verb inversion with as occur based on any logical reason?
No. In fact, no grammatical pattern is, strictly speaking, based on logic! Certain patterns came about historically as the language, like every other language, evolved throughout the centuries. As it turns out, subject-verb inversion is a prominent feature of the English language.

It occurs in these situations:

To form direct questions.

Henry has bought a new car. > Has Henry bought a new car?

After introductory negations.

Henry has never bought a diamond ring. > Never has Henry bought a diamond ring.

After introductory 'only'.

Henry would only play football on Saturdays. > Only on Saturdays would Henry play football.

With 'as'. This is optional and occurs mostly in more formal styles.

Henry used to play tennis as often as Karen did. > Henry used to play tennis as often as did Karen.

Lucy was not as pretty as Janet was. > Lucy was not as pretty as was Janet.

Bob and Ken were on the swimming team, as Mark and Brian were. >

Bob and Ken were on the swimming team, as were Mark and Brian.

With 'than'. This is also optional, and also occurs mostly in more formal styles.

Paula is more intelligent than Sam is. > Paula is more intelligent than is Sam.

CJ
There's always no wonder left after your explanations.

So simple and so clear[Emotion: party]

Thank you!

m
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
mitsuwao23There's always no wonder left after your explanations.
But hopefully there will still be some wonder left in other aspects of your life!

mitsuwao23Thank you!
You're welcome! Emotion: wink

CJ