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Hi,

Which one of the following is correct? If all are correct, what situations would warrant one and not the others? Thank you/

- Please do not sit on the couch until you have gotten permission.

- Please do not sit on the couch before you have gotten permission.

- Please do not sit on the couch until you get permission.

- Please do not sit on the couch before you get permission.

The differences amongst the sentences above are two-fold: 1) until vs. before 2) present tense vs. present perfect after the temporal adverb.
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Hi,

Welcome to the Forum.

Which one of the following is correct? If all are correct, what situations would warrant one and not the others? Thank you/

- Please do not sit on the couch until you have gotten permission.

- Please do not sit on the couch before you have gotten permission.

- Please do not sit on the couch until you get permission.

- Please do not sit on the couch before you get permission.

The differences amongst the sentences above are two-fold: 1) until vs. before 2) present tense vs. present perfect after the temporal adverb.

Theyare all correct. Often, these expressions could be interchanged. Any differences here are fairly subtle. Here are a few comments.

First, I would say 'got' rather than 'gotten'. Both forms are OK. I believe 'gotten' is more a feature of American English.

'Until' suggests to me that the speaker expects permission to be given. I don't feel this so much with 'before'. 'Until' also seems to place more stress on the length of the period prior to your getting permisiion.

The present tense suggests to me more immediacy. ie the expected sequence of events is that you get permission and then you immediately/quickly sit down.

The present perfect suggests to me less immediacy. ie First, you get permission. After that, you are in a state of 'having got permission'. Now, anytime you want to, you can sit down.

But, as i said, often these variations are just interchanged.

Best wishes, Clive
Comments  
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Thank you Clive.

What about this: Please do not sit on the couch before getting permission.

In this case, I'm trying to avoid using a verb phrase after the adverb before by replacing it with (what I'm thinking to be) a gerund noun.

Is this acceptable (not using a verb phrase after an adverb such as "before")?

Thank you again.
Hi,

Yes, it's fine.

In formal writing, a word like 'obtain' or 'receive' is often used in preference to 'get'.

We use words like get/put/do/make all the time in everyday speech, but we tend to avoid them in our serious writing. Perhaps they are too blunt, not sufficiently nuanced.Emotion: smile

Clive