Help please.

A message goes like this:

"On the occasion of the 10th anniversary of our company, I would like to thank everyone who blah blah blah.

In 2001, we were on the brink of economic collapse. Today, we are the number one manufacturing company in the world.

Many challenges lie ahead, but with enduring commitment and hard work, I can foresee a bright future for the company.

Ten years hence, I am confident that we will go from strength to strength in the years ahead."

Please check the use of ten years hence. It should mean "After ten years," but I think it gives the opposite meaning given the preceding lines. What can I use to replace it aside from "after ten years"?

Kindly disregard any other errors for now as I just made up the sentences to ask my question about "hence." I want to make sure it's wrong before I change it as this is from a VIP who needs it now. Sorry if I sound like I'm rushing you all.

Thank you very much.

Sarcandra
Consider:

'I am confident that we will go from strength to strength in the next ten years.'

Rover
Thanks. But what it needs to say is, "After ten years of existence, I am confident..."

Any other suggestions?
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'Hence' means 'from now', so it is wrong, sarcandra.

In 2001, we were on the brink of economic collapse. Today, we are the number one manufacturing company in the world. Many challenges lie ahead, but with enduring commitment and hard work, I can foresee a bright future for the company.

Today, I am confident that we will go from strength to strength in the years ahead.
That's right, Mr M.

I misunderstood the OP.

Rover
Thanks, Mr. M.
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