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1. Nurses tended the injured people.

2. Nurses tended to the injured people.

Are both of my sentences fine?
Comments  
Yes. However:

Tend (vt) = to have the care of; watch over; look after: tend a child.
Tend to (vi) = to apply one's attention; attend: no time to tend to my diary. (Am Heritage Dict)
Rex1. Nurses tended the injured people.

2. Nurses tended to the injured people.

Are both of my sentences fine?
Nurses tended the injured people. (correct)

Doctors attended the injured people.
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Hi all,

So you won't allow "Nurses tended to the the injured people"? When I read the original post I felt this was my preferred option. At least the Longman Dictonary seems to agree with me:

also tend to somebody/something [transitive] old-fashioned to look after someone or something:

Sofia was in the bedroom tending to her son.



I'm not saying you guys are wrong, I'm just trying to sort out the wires in my multilanguage mind.Emotion: wink

Patrick
Search with:
"tended to the injured"
at
http://www.nytimes.com
and you'll find it's fine:
http://query.nytimes.com/search/query?query=%22tended+to+the+injured%22&srchst=nyt
Rex1. Nurses tended the injured people.

2. Nurses tended to the injured people.

Are both of my sentences fine?
I would try attended to for #2.

MrP
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According to the Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary, the 'to' is optional. (tend (to) somebody/something). The example sentences are: Doctors and nurses tended the injured. / Ambulance crew were tending to the injured.