What tense is How are you she asked and how would you change ot to reported speech?
Hi,

What tense is "How are you?", she asked and how would you change ot to reported speech?

How are you Simple Present

she asked Simple Past

how would you change ot to reported speech?

eg (if she was talking to me) She asked me how I was.

eg (if she was talking to someone else) She asked the person how he was.

Please say 'please' when you ask us to help you.

Thanks,

Clive
Thanks for your help and advise Clive.
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Hi,

You're welcome.

Clive
Hi Clive can you clarify the direct speech ("How are you?" she asked.) for me please. I accept that you are correct as its what I have come to as well, however every grammar book I have and several websites I have visited all give the rule for inquisative present simple as auxiliary verb (do) + subject + base form. In this case we seem to be ending with the subject (you).
Hi,

can you clarify the direct speech ("How are you?" she asked.) for me please. I accept that you are correct as its what I have come to as well, however every grammar book I have and several websites I have visited all give the rule for inquisative present simple as auxiliary verb (do) + subject + base form. In this case we seem to be ending with the subject (you).

I assume you mean something like

Q - How does Tom run?

A - Tom runs quickly.

The verb 'be' is very irregular. eg

Q - How is Tom?

A - Tom is fine.

I'm sure your gramar books must explain this. Look again.

As far as I know, the similar form 'How runs Tom?' was once used, but is now archaic.

However, we still sometimes see this form today in a few uncommon questions like

What say you? http://www.learnersdictionary.com/blog.php?action=ViewBlogArticle&ba_id=105

How goes it? http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/How+goes+it%3f

How dare you?

Clive
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Thanks again Clive. Yes in reading the books I came to the conclusion this is an irregular form of the rule because of be or perhaps because through usage we have dropped off "do". It helps a lot though to have it confirmed.