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Hi, teachers!

I am confused about tense…

Could you please tell me if the verb ‘did’ in the following sentence is correct, supposing that ‘I’ will be back before ‘mom’ comes back?

(Talking to his brother…)

“I’m going to use mom’s car this afternoon, but please don’t tell her that I (did).”

Thank you for your help!
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Comments  (Page 2) 
Certainly, will borrow won't work -- that sounds like you won't borrow it until he gets up. I will start dinner when you get home. I will borrow his car when he gets up.

I don't see much difference in this case been borrowed and have borrowed. I guess it depends on whether you think that the "borrowing" is the point when you take the car, or for the full duration of when you have the car. I'm leaning toward the latter so that "have borrowed" does work better.

(Note: My car has just died not My car just has died. Probably just a typo.)
Thank you very much, Grammar Geek, for the additional information.

Also, I found the queston from dimsumexpress very interesting.

Your answer helped a lot. Thanks again.
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ladybird25Hi, teachers!
I am confused about tense…
Could you please tell me if the verb ‘did’ in the following sentence is correct, supposing that ‘I’ will be back before ‘mom’ comes back?
(Talking to his brother…)
“I’m going to use mom’s car this afternoon, but please don’t tell her that I (did).”

Yes it is - the tense is fine. What you are saying is that at some unspecified time in the future you don't want your brother to tell your mom about something that happened in the past (i.e. the using of mom's car). 'Did' is understood as "borrowed mom's car", the missing infinitival complement being recoverable from the preceding clause, (we call this clause reduction).

BillJ
Don't these also work?

"Can you please tell him I will have borrowed his car when he gets up"

"I’m going to use mom’s car this afternoon, but please don’t tell her that I will have borrowed his car"
Grammar GeekI don't see much difference in this case been borrowed and have borrowed

Really?

'have borrowed' to me indicates that he will still be borrowing the car when his father wakes. 'borrowed' indicates that the he will be have the car back by the time his father wakes.
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As I said, it depends on whether you consider the "borrowing" to be the act of first taking the car or the entire time you have the car. In the scenario described, the car would still be gone when the father woke up.
What you are saying is that at some unspecified time in the future you don't want your brother to tell your mom about something that happened in the past (i.e. the using of mom's car).

Hi BillJ,

Yes, that's exactly what I wanted to say.

Thanks a lot!
Grammar GeekIn the scenario described, the car would still be gone when the father woke up.

In the original scenario? In the original, the car will be home when he wakes.
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Grammar GeekCertainly, will borrow won't work -- that sounds like you won't borrow it until he gets up. I will start dinner when you get home. I will borrow his car when he gets up.I don't see much difference in this case been borrowed and have borrowed. I guess it depends on whether you think that the "borrowing" is the point when you take the car, or for the full duration of when you have the car. I'm leaning toward the latter so that "have borrowed" does work better. (Note: My car has just died not My car just has died. Probably just a typo.)
The original sentence presented a real challenge because of the intricate time relationships.
(Talking to his brother…)

“I’m going to use mom’s car this afternoon, but please don’t tell her that I (did).”

In retrospect, "have borrowed" has some issue with the implied past tense in contrasting context with future environment as the "borrowing" of the car has not materialized as yet. Also, in my story scenario:
***********

Can you please tell him that I will borrow / borrowed/ have borrowed his car when he gets up (he just came home from work and went to bed). I'll be back with his car before he goes to work tonight (graveshift).***************

" When you see dad, don't tell him that I will borrow his car....." also sounds awkward semamtically.

So after digesting all the thoughts from all, I came to this conclusion.

Since the time of intent to use mom's car is this afternoon(which is future)

I would say " please don't tell her I am borrowing her car this afternoon....." is a good alternative which can satisfy the present context of intent in your conversation with your brother, and yet, carry an hidden future intent to borrow.
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