Hi.

What's the difference between these two sentences?

I have been living in New York since 1987.

I have lived in New York since 1987.

and also between the following sentences.

I lived in New York for10 years.

I was living in New York for 10 years.

Thanks
hrsaneiWhat's the difference between these two sentences?
I have been living in New York since 1987.
I have lived in New York since 1987.
None. With live and work (and maybe a few other verbs) you can use the simple or continuous form without changing the meaning. The continuous form may emphasize a certain amount of liveliness or activity not emphasized in the simple form, but the difference is not very dramatic.

hrsaneiI lived in New York for10 years.
I was living in New York for 10 years.
The first sounds good; the second sounds weird. The second is a bit contradictory. The past continuous indicates an open time period, i.e., a period with undefined limits - no definite beginning or end. It's just "living going on in the past". But the phrase "for 10 years" seems to close off the time period by putting limits on it, which contradicts the indefiniteness of the continuous form.

CJ
No difference between I HAVE BEEN LIVING..... and I HAVE LIVED.....

I LIVED IN NEW YORK FOR 10 YEARS means that you lived there for that period in the past and now you are not living there. I think I WAS LIVING IN NEW YORK FOR 10 YEARS is wrong because when time is expressed, we should use past perfect tense.
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Thanks Jim.

Thank Mr. Abooty.

I have the impression that the use of present perfect indicates that I am still living in a place, But when we use present perfect, it is not clear if I still live there or not.

Help me if I am wrong.