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Hi, Is that correct to have both a present and present continous tenses in a single math question? Does it not have a possibility of creating confusion to readers? Would you resort to same tenses - both present and both present continouous? Note: this is made-up and I am not sure whether a person skating can go 10 miles ah hour.

Susie is skating at 10 miles an hour around a track. Joe starts at the same time but only goes 5 miles per hour. How many minutes after they start will Susie pass Joe if the track is 2 miles long?
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Hi,
Is that correct to have both a present and present continous tenses in a single math question? Does it not have a possibility of creating confusion to readers? Would you resort to same tenses - both present and both present continouous? Note: this is made-up and I am not sure whether a person skating can go 10 miles ah hour.

Susie is skating at 10 miles an hour around a track. Joe starts at the same time but only goes 5 miles per hour. How many minutes after they start will Susie pass Joe if the track is 2 miles long?

The Present Continuous means that Susie is skating 'now'. That means she started at a time in the past. If Joe started at the same time, that means he too started in the past, and he is skating 'now'. So, say this.

Susie is skating at 10 miles an hour around a track. Joe started at the same time but is only going 5 miles per hour. How many minutes after they started will Susie pass Joe if the track is 2 miles long?

You can have a variety of tenses in such questions, as long as they support the situation you wish to describe.
eg Susie is skating at 10 miles an hour around a track. Joe starts now . . . .
eg Susie is skating at 10 miles an hour around a track. Joe will start one hour from now . . . .

Best wishes, Clive

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Hi,
If I saw a similar tense patterns being used in a test question in a test booklet given to students and the booklet seemed like from a credible source. Why do you think they used the tenses as they did?

original example question:

Susie is skating at 10 miles an hour around a track. Joe starts at the same time but only goes 5 miles per hour. How many minutes after they start will Susie pass Joe if the track is 2 miles long?
Hi,
Often, we use present tense for everything when we tell a simple story, and don't worry too much about being exactly clear about the sequence of events. So, I guess the person who wrote the test felt that the meaning was sufficiently clear as written.

Best wishes, Clive