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Is there any difference between these two sentences?

I have been waiting here for an hour.

I have waited here for an hour.

Also, can this sentence be interpreted as someone having the experience of buying a car?

I have bought a car.

I think it would be clearer if I added "before" or "just" but I want to know what this could mean.

Thanks,

mack
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in my opinion;
I have been waiting here for an hour. it's finished just now
I have waited here for an hour. when it's finished unknown
But they both sound to me like they're finished just now.
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I have been waiting here for an hour.

You are in the process of waiting there and the period (from the past, one hour ago, until now) has not finished. You are waiting for someone and he still hasn't arrived. You tell someone, "I have been waiting here for an hour, and my friend still hasn't arrived. I wonder how much longer he will take."

I have waited here for an hour.

At some unspecified time in the past you have waited there for the duration of an hour. When walking through the city, passing a square, your friend might say, "I remember that square. I have waited there for an hour to get a taxi."
Thanks for your help!

Could you also take a look at my second question?

Thanks,

mack
I have waited here for an hour. (= I arrived an hour ago and my waiting has just finished)

I wouldn't use the present perfect to refer to an event which happened earlier in the past.

I have bought a car.

This is very similar to saying 'I have a car now'. For instance you could be breaking the news to your friend.

If you've just bought a car, use just.
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IvanhrI have waited here for an hour. (= I arrived an hour ago and my waiting has just finished)

I wouldn't use the present perfect to refer to an event which happened earlier in the past.

And I wouldn't use the Present Perfect Simple to say how long something lasted (apart from stative verbs), as this tense focuses more on the result of an activity, rather than the activity (or its duration) itself.

I would use the Present Perfect Continuous to do so, even if my waiting has just finished:

- I have been waiting for you for an hour now! Where have you been???
- I have been waiting for him for an hour now. I guess he might have forgotten about me.

With some verbs that denote a state rather than action, I would use the Present Perfect Simple though:

How long have you been a teacher?

Michal
MichalS
IvanhrI have waited here for an hour. (= I arrived an hour ago and my waiting has just finished)

I wouldn't use the present perfect to refer to an event which happened earlier in the past.

How long have you been a teacher?

Michal

I'm not a teacher.

I'm a little bit confused here =/

What exactly does

" I have waited here for an hour"

mean ?

@Ivanhr, I think MichalS was just giving me an example Emotion: big smile
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