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Hi there,

Practical English Grammar by Michael Swan says that the tense in the since-clause can be perfect or past, depending on the meaning. This made me wonder if there is a difference in meaning between the following:

a. I've known her since we were at school together. (Simple past suggests that we are not at school together???)

b. I've known her since we have been at school together. (Present perfect suggests that we are still at school together???)

I am not a native speaker ,so I would like a confirmation from an expert native speaker.

Comments  

a. Yes, you've got it right. This sentence means you and the woman went to school together at some time in the past, and are now out of school. The implication here is that the two of you were in school a long time ago, years, or even decades, ago.


b. Yes, you've got it right. This sentence means you and the woman are currently in school together. However, the sentence is awkward. If you and the woman are at school together, it goes without saying that you know her.

Magic79b. I've known her since we have been at school together. (Present perfect suggests that we are still at school together???)

That is not possible in my American dialect, and I daresay nowhere.