+0
1. He waited until she went to bed.

2. He waited until she had gone to bed.

Hi. I made up the two sentences.

Do they both mean she did go to bed?

Thank you.

Previously asked here:

http://forum.wordreference.com/threads/until-i-should-have-heard.3629785/#post-18499471

+0
zuotengdazuoDo they both mean she did go to bed?

Yes.

Comments  
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
GPY
zuotengdazuoDo they both mean she did go to bed?

Yes.

Thank you, GPY.

I hesitated to jump until I had heard what passed between my saviour and the ruffian who pursued me.

Then how do you think of this sentence? Do you think it implies that he hadn’t yet heard it?

zuotengdazuoThank you, GPY.
I hesitated to jump until I had heard what passed between my saviour and the ruffian who pursued me. Then how do you think of this sentence?
Do you think it implies that he hadn’t yet heard it?

You've changed the question from "did" to "hadn't yet".

1. He waited until she went to bed.
2. He waited until she had gone to bed.

Do they both mean she did go to bed? Yes.
Do they both mean that she hadn't gone to bed yet? Yes, if "yet" is as of the time of "waited".

I hesitated to jump until I had heard what passed between my saviour and the ruffian who pursued me.

Does it mean that he did hear it? Probably, but we can't be certain.
Does it mean that he hadn't heard it yet? Yes, if "yet" is as of the time of "hesitated".

Thank you again.

But what do you mean by “if ‘yet’ is as of the time of ‘waited/hesitated’”?

And I have another pair of sentences.

We did not notice this matter until he told us about it.

We did not notice this matter until he had told us about it.

What is the difference between the above two versions?

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
zuotengdazuoBut what do you mean by “if ‘yet’ is as of the time of ‘waited/hesitated’”?

When we say "She hasn't yet gone to bed", we mean that as of now she hasn't gone to bed. When we say "She hadn’t yet gone to bed", there has to be an implied "now" in the past for the statement to apply to. It isn't very clear from the way you posed the question when this "now of the past" is supposed to be. However, if it is during the time he was waiting then, of course, she hadn't yet gone to bed at that time.

zuotengdazuoWe did not notice this matter until he told us about it.
We did not notice this matter until he had told us about it.
What is the difference between the above two versions?

The second is more explicit that "told us" was completed before "notice". However, because it is obvious how the events transpired, we understand the first sentence the same anyway, so there is no important difference in meaning. The first sentence would be more usual, I would say, perhaps because we tend to dispense with the more complicated tense where it is not necessary. Examples may exist where the difference between "until he verbed" and "until he had verbed" is more important.

Thank you very much. I see.