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Hi, Please correct the tenses. I think the usual approach is to use present tenses for situations like this:

Joe goes (not, 'went') in to buy an ice cream and buys (not, 'bought') one that costs one dollar and fifty cents. He pays (not, 'paid') two dollars. How much is his change?

But setting aside that issue, would you say these are correct?

1. Jenny had six apples. She was hungry and eats (has to be 'ate'?) two. How many are left?

2. Joe went into a store and bought a candy that costs one dollar and a chocolate bar that costs one dollar and ten cents. How much does (did??) he have to pay to the cashier?

3. Joe went into a store and bought a candy that costs one dollar and a chocolate bar that costs one dollar and ten cents. He handed a five-dollar bill. How much does (did??) he have to get back in change?

4. Joe had two candies. Since it is/was? a holiday, he eats/ate all of them. How many does/did? he have (now)?
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Hi,

Please correct the tenses. I think the usual approach is to use present tenses for situations like this: Yes, it often is.

Joe goes (not, 'went') in to buy an ice cream and buys (not, 'bought') one that costs one dollar and fifty cents. He pays (not, 'paid') two dollars. How much is his change?

But setting aside that issue, would you say these are correct?

1. Jenny had six apples. She was hungry and ate two. How many were left?

2. Joe went into a store and bought a candy that cost one dollar and a chocolate bar that cost one dollar and ten cents. How much did he have to pay to the cashier?

3. Joe went into a store and bought a candy that cost one dollar and a chocolate bar that cost one dollar and ten cents. He handed a five-dollar bill to the cashier. How much did he have to get back in change?

4. Joe had two candies. Since it was a holiday, he ate both of them. Not much of a celebration. How many did he have then?

Best wishes, Clive
Hi, Thank you.

It always gets me confused: Why does it have to be "that cost some amount" and not "that costs some amount"?

I also have difficulty understanding why it has to be "it consists of" and not "it is consisted."

Do my problems stem from the same source? Could you explain to me why the things are how they are?
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Hi,
It's better if you write a few complete sentences in which you try to use these phrases.

Thank you, Clive
Thank you. Are they correct?

1. The shirt which cost (not 'costs'?) five dollars is up for grab.
2. I like the shirt you are wearing that you said costed five dollars.
3. Did you say your shirt costed five dollars?
4. How much this shirt cost (not 'costs?)
It costs five dollars.
5. This shirt costing five dollars suits me fine.
1. The shirt, which costs five dollars, is up for grabs. Do you know what "up for grabs" means?
2. I like the shirt you are wearing that you said costed five dollars.
3. Did you say your shirt costed five dollars?
4. How much
does this shirt cost? You need the "does" - once you have "does" the main verb goes to its base form.
It costs five dollars. Yes
5. This shirt costing five dollars suits me fine.
Probably grammatically okay, but not natural. This shirt, which will cost $5, suits me fine.

Also,

These two shirts, which cost $5 each... - two shirts cost, one shirt costs.

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Thank you. I think the phrase 'up for grabs' with the 's' means "up (open) for anyone to take."

Why did Clive use 'cost' rather than 'costs' here?

2. Joe went into a store and bought a candy that cost one dollar and a chocolate bar that cost one dollar and ten cents. How much did he have to pay to the cashier?

What is the difference between this and the number one sentence with your correction?

1. The shirt, which costs five dollars, is up for grabs. Do you know what "up for grabs" means?
Hi,
1. The shirt which cost (not 'costs'?) five dollars is up for grabs.

Why did Clive use 'cost' rather than 'costs' here?

It just depends on what you mean to say.

If you are looking at the shirt in the store right now, say the present tense 'costs'. 'Up for grabs' is an odd way of saying that something is on sale in a store.

If you bought the shirt 10 years ago and are offering it to your friend to wear (ie it's up for grabs), then say the past tense 'cost'.

Best wishes, Clive
Thank you, all. Clive, could I lay out the similar reasoning as what you did with the "cost" for these ones too? the present tense 'cost' if still in that price and the past tense 'costed' if the price has changed or uncertain as to whether the price has changed or not?

GG corrected like these:

2. I like the shirt you are wearing that you said costed five dollars.
3. Did you say your shirt costed five dollars?
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