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Hi guys!

1.Paul was tired because he worked hard.
2. Paul was tired because he was working hard.

Can I use both and what is the difference in meaning? Maybe I should add something more to the second sentence, like "yesterday morning"? Someone has told me that in the second example Paul is still working, he hasn't finished, is it true?

2. Is it possible to use both, especially the second one:

How long have you been learning English?

How long were you learning English?

Thanks
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Comments  
NG:
You do not need to add any more to the second sentence.
Both sentences are fine.
The first implies that Paul worked on some job, he finished his work, and was tired afterwards..
THe second implies that Paul was working, and he was tired even before he finished working.
Newguest2. Is it possible to use both, especially the second one:

How long have you been learning English?

How long were you learning English?
Both are OK.
The second implies that you are not learning English now, but were at some time in the past.
The first implies that you are still learning English.
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Hi

Can you give me some example/conversation in which you would use "How long were you learning English?"
NewguestCan you give me some example/conversation
Oof!!! Good luck contextualizing that one! Emotion: smile
I may accept that challenge later. It's just that I don't have the time just now. Emotion: wink
CJ
CalifJim
NewguestCan you give me some example/conversation
Oof!!! Good luck contextualizing that one!

I may accept that challenge later. It's just that I don't have the time just now.

CJ

It may be just two lines (something short) if it's possible Emotion: wink

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I heard that you studied English when you were living in India..
How long were you actually learning English there?
AlpheccaStars I heard that you studied English when you were living in India..

How long were you actually learning English there?

many thanks AS!

NewguestCan you give me some example/conversation in which you would use "How long were you learning English?"
If you Google "How long were you learning" you'll find almost nothing. The verb learning doesn't work particularly well here, the more idiomatic expression being How long did it take you to learn ...
Nevertheless, I found an example that illustrates the contrast between the progressive and simple past tenses in a fairly idiomatic way.
How long were you learning the guitar before you got the hang of it?
As I mentioned before, the past progressive is often a scene-setting tense for a simple past event, so sometimes you don't feel as though you're getting the whole story until you're told what the event is.
How long were you learning English before you became really good at it? therefore sounds much more like authentic English (to my ear) than just How long were you learning English?
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Further Google research shows that How long were you ---ing ...? goes quite often with a before clause, thus:

How long were you trading before you became profitable?

How long were you dating your partner before you got married?

How long were you dating before you got engaged?

How long were you dating before you said, "I love you"?

How long were you using WTM before you participated in the forums?

How long were you dieting before you noticed any results?

How long were you playing before you hit the jackpot?

How long were you going to that school before your father filed the lawsuit?

How long were you playing before you knew this was the thing for you?
In every case, slightly higher-register English would have used How long had you been instead of How long were you, thus,
How long had you been playing before you hit the jackpot?
CJ
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