Choose the word or phrase which best completes each sentence. Enjoy! Emotion: smile

_________________________


  1. I'm going to …… a big party for Ella's birthday this summer.
  2. I managed to pass my driving test first time, but it was a thing.
  3. Her maths improved by leaps and……… and she got 90% in her final exam.
  4. I was in the ……… of despair before I heard the good news.
  5. You're just … your head against a brick wall -- you might as well give up now.
  6. She didn't give chapter and……… but I got a general idea of what she meant.
  7. I've always been very of my grandmother.
  8. His comments about our project ………… me thinking.
  9. The girl managed to ………a conversation while doing her homework.
  10. The bedspread was … up of hundreds of small squares of material sewn together.
  11. Local residents have complained about the music constantly………… from the club.
  12. The film's success is amazing……… the poor reviews it has received.



(From: Newbrook J. & Wilson J. (2001) New Proficiency Gold Coursebook. Edimburgh: Longman - Pearson Education Limited.)
1 2 3 4 5
Many of these are idomatic expressions, which we merely 'parrot', if you will, without caring if it makes sense or is grammatically correct.

For example 'chapter and verse', 'leaps and bounds' always seem paired - for no apparent reason.

'His comments about our project GOT'. I have heard people rail about the use of 'got', claiming that you NEVER need to or should use it.

'MADE UP OF' do we really need 'UP' in there, or is it even correct?

How far can you 'throw a party' really.

And how about hafta, gotta, gonna, wanna, shoulda... even on the news - Peter Jennings started using them on the evening news! Why are Americans so accepting of such sloppy speech, when the French, for example, cyclically remove such dreck for their language to keep it FRENCH, instead of letting it become some new gutteral, mongrelized version
AnonymousAnd how about hafta, gotta, gonna, wanna, shoulda... even on the news - Peter Jennings started using them on the evening news!
If I fully enunciated "have to" "going to", "want to" and other common reductions in a casual conversation, my comrades would think I was being stuck up and superior. This would not be conducive to winning friends.
Language is a living thing, and changes in pronunciation, grammar, and vocabulary are part of its natural evolution. There is no "Academy of English" - it is truly a grass-roots democratic language with many dialects and variations; its changes are directed by millions of people writing and speaking every day.

By the way, Americans typically stereotype the French and British upper class of having these sorts of affectations.
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Hi Anon,

Thanks for commenting.
Anonymous'MADE UP OF' do we really need 'UP' in there, or is it even correct?
Yes, it is correct. See the following entry from the Cambridge online dictionary , and especially the second example.

make up sth (FORM) phrasal verb
to form a particular thing, amount or number as a whole:
Road accident victims make up almost a quarter of the hospital's patients.
The book is made up of a number of different articles.
AnonymousHow far can you 'throw a party' really.
To throw a party is a common collocation in the UK. From what I've gathered in this forum, I think it's not in the USA. Again, here are two entries from the Cambridge online dictionary (throw and party, respectively).

throw Emotion: party verb
throw a party to have a party:
Janet threw a party for Jack's fiftieth birthday.


party (CELEBRATION) noun [C]
a social event where a group of people meet to talk, eat, drink, dance, etc., often in order to celebrate a special occasion: (...)
Peter has/gives/throws really wild parties.


Does it help if I add that this test comes from a British book? Emotion: wink
I wouldn't call it sloppy, I would call it evolving. Every language changes over time and things that were once unacceptable change in nature. Is it really so bad to abbreviate 'should have' into shoulda? You save yourself from writing/typing/a breath of air by making it shorter. Language isn't some rigid block that is not supposed to change. It changes with culture, people and time.
TanitTo throw a party is a common collocation in the UK. From what I've gathered in this forum, I think it's not in the USA.
Oh yes, we Americans throw parties, too!
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AlpheccaStarsOh yes, we Americans throw parties, too!
Thank you, A-Emotion: stars. Emotion: smile
I can't remember why I got that idea. It must be something I read in a thread long ago. Emotion: embarrassed
it i svery helpful for beginners. It can be better if explanation would be given for every answer. it will  make the learner not to repeat its mistake

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repharimI wouldn't call it sloppy, I would call it evolving. Every language changes over time and things that were once unacceptable change in nature. Is it really so bad to abbreviate 'should have' into shoulda? You save yourself from writing/typing/a breath of air by making it shorter. Language isn't some rigid block that is not supposed to change. It changes with culture, people and time.


I agree with this but I wouldn't write 'should have' as 'shoulda' unless, I was directly quoting or writing in vernacularly. We already have a contraction for the concept, should've. This is actually why many of our words have pronunciations different than their spelling. For instance, German and Old English pronounced a hard 'k' at the beginning of the word knight and the gh was pronounced too.
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