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Stone ground flour is milled by a slow process using granite stones, often powered by water which scatters the bran evenly through the flour and keeps the flour cooler than when ground with steel rollers.

than--conjunction joining what to what (what two equal sentence parts)?

Thanks
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Hi,

Stone ground flour is milled by a slow process using granite stones, often powered by water which scatters the bran evenly through the flour and keeps the flour cooler than when ground with steel rollers.

than--conjunction joining what to what (what two equal sentence parts)?

keeps the flour cooler than when (the flour is) ground with steel rollers.

A simpler example is

Soap keeps my hands cleaner than when (my hands are) washed with dirty engine oil.

( You need a comma after 'water' if you want 'which scatters . . ' to refer to 'process'.

Without such a comma, 'which scatters . . ' refers to 'water'. )

Clive
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Hi and thanks, Clive.

1) One more thing. What two clauses are these then?

The first is a relative clause= "which scatters... and keeps the flour cooler than



when the flour is ground with steel rollers"= ?

2) And can conjunctions join different clause types like in this case?
Hi,

Stone ground flour is milled by a slow process using granite stones, often powered by water which scatters the bran evenly through the flour and keeps the flour cooler than when ground with steel rollers.

1) One more thing. What two clauses are these then?

The first is a relative clause=

"which scatters... seems adjectival to me, describing 'process'.

and (which) keeps the flour cooler again, seems adjectival to me, describing 'process'.



than



when the flour is ground with steel rollers"= ? Seems to me like a noun clause.

Consider you could replace it with a noun.

ie (which) keeps the flour cooler than something.

2) And can conjunctions join different clause types like in this case? Sure.

Clive