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Hello. One of my friends said, "The sign on the road makes me laugh. 'Thank you for coming ...' has also an obsolete meaning." I think we can use this expression like "Thank you for coming all the way here".

But do English people associate this expression with something sexy?

Tell me one more thing. How about the expression "I'm coming." ?
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There is a sexual meaning to verb "to come" (to have an orgasm) but only the most juvenile person would hear "Thank you for coming" and be so taken by the sexual aspect that they are unable to understand the intended meaning.

And yes, when someone says "I'm coming" there is a stock answer "You're not even breathing heavy" but it's almost a rote response. And I certainly wouldn't say it to my mother.
Hi all,
Sorry for bringing up an old post. But I have two questions:
And yes, when someone says "I'm coming" there is a stock answer "You're not even breathing heavy" but it's almost a rote response. And I certainly wouldn't say it to my mother.
1) What does "stock answer" mean?
2) What would be a natural response if say someone is calling for you from downstairs ? I can't think of anything other than "I'm coming" Emotion: embarrassed
I know it a funny question, but I'm going to join a college in U.S soon and I want to avoid such embarassing situations Emotion: smile (I know how some students can change the meaning of your words to make it sound funny, its a common thing between all students in the world Emotion: smile)

Thank you,
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A "stock" answer is a standard answer used in a situation that occurs often.

If a wife asks her husband "Does this dress make me look fat," the stock answer is "You look beautiful to me." (Do NOT say "It ain't the dress that's the problem, sweetheart.")

You can say "I'll be there in must a moment" or "I'm on my way."
Just for an alternative, can we use a simpler sentence "I'm going down"?
LOL, hahaha. Thank you very much Grammar Geek, I understand everything perfectly now Emotion: smile. I can't imagine what would happen if I say "It ain't the dress that's the problem, sweetheart."

Vthung, I'm not a native speaker, but I think that "going down" implies another meaning, like getting worse or something, but I'm not sure
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VthungJust for an alternative, can we use a simpler sentence "I'm going down"?
Good heavens! If you're trying to avoid having any type of sexual connotation, this is NOT the expression to use. It has its own sexual association.
Hmmm. I wonder if GG has just been baited, and took the bait.

CJ
It's always possible - if you look up "gullible" you'll find my picture there. But for the sake of people learning this crazy language, I thought I should register my vehement advise to NOT use that phrase!
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