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The possessive is tough for me.
Are the following sentences correct?

#1. Thanks for coming today.
#2. Thanks for coming to our party today.
#3. Thanks for your coming today.
#4. Thanks for your coming to our party today.

I think all of them are correct but am not sure.
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Comments  
The possessive is tough for me.
Are the following sentences correct?

#1. Thanks for coming today.
#2. Thanks for coming to our party today.
#3. Thanks for your coming today.
#4. Thanks for your coming to our party today.

I think all of them are correct but am not sure.
It's uncommon in my experience to use the possessive like this after "thanks," which is a bit casual.

Even "Thank you for your coming," strikes me as unusual, but I'm not prepared to say it's incorrect.

It's more commonly used following a transitive verb, where the gerund or noun is the direct object:

We appreciate your coming.

We regret your absense.

It seems that following "Thanks," we'd use the possessive with a noun, but not with a gerund:

Thanks for your concern. (noun)

Thanks for taking the time to help out. (gerund)

Thanks for helping. (gerund)

Thanks for your patience. (noun)

- A.
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Hi,
The possessive is tough for me.
Are the following sentences correct?

#1. Thanks for coming today.
#2. Thanks for coming to our party today.
#3. Thanks for your coming today.
#4. Thanks for your coming to our party today.

I think all of them are correct but am not sure.
All are correct grammar.
However, #3 and #4 do not sound natural, because the 'your' would be assumed by the person you are speaking to.

eg If you say to me, 'Thank you for coming', I don't think 'Oh, whose coming is he thanking me for?' I just assume you are referring to my coming.

Best wishes, Clive
Wow!
Shock!
But thanks!

It's a little bit tough for me to understand why #3, #4, and "Thank you for your coming," are uncommon. Why are they uncommon? Or what do you feel when you see or hear them? Or What's wrong with them?
"Thanks" is never addressed to anyone but "you", so specifying who performed the act for which thanks are be given is redundant. To be more specific: You are never going to say Thanks for his coming to the party. It's understood that Thanks for coming is thanking you for the fact that you came. There's no need to add more words.

CJ
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Oops! I didn't delete this duplicate post fast enough!

CJ
Thanks, Clive and CJ

Sorry for posting two same questions.
I posted this question and waited about an hour but this question didn't appear on the board, so I thought I misoperated and posted the same questio again.

Please see the other question that has the same title.
OK.
Thanks.

But I think your is usually used in the following sentneces, i.e. in case a noun or nouns follow for.

#5. Thanks for your help.
#6. Thanks for your delicious juice.

I think your is unnecessary in #5 and #6 if your is unnecessary in #3 and #4 because these four sentences are the same.
Why is your unnecessary in #3 and #4 while it's usually used in #5 and #6?
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