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If you choose your friend on the ground that you are virtuous and want virtuous company, you are no nearer to true friendship than if you choose them for commercial reasons. Besides, who are you that you should be setting a price upon your friendship? It is enough for any man that he has the divine power of making friends, and he must lever it to that power to determine who his friends shall be.


I wonder why "that" is used grammatically.

If "It" is "A", I would like to know the meaning of "B".

A: that he has the divine power of making friends, and he must lever it to that power to determine who his friends shall be.

B: It is enough for any man that he has the divine power of making friends, and he must lever it to that power to determine who his friends shall be.

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[email protected]I wonder why "that" is used grammatically.
[email protected]who are you that you should be setting a price upon your friendship?

This is an idiom. It has two forms. The second form below is the most used.

Who are you that you (should) ...?
Who are you to ...?

The meaning is "Why do you think that you have the right to ...?" with the implication that "You don't have the right to ...". The speaker is offended by what he considers the rudeness of his partner in conversation.

Who are you to make a comment about anybody or anything related to football?
(You know nothing about football.)
Who are you to condemn a person for keeping their medical records private?
(You are wrong to condemn a person for keeping their medical records private.)
Who are you to decide what constitutes a worthwhile trip for others?
(You have no right to say what is a worthwhile trip for other people.)

Who are you that you presume to pass judgment on your neighbor?
Who are you that you should tell us how it's done?
Who are you that you should demand this?

CJ

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[email protected]

If "It" is "A", I would like to know the meaning of "B".

A: that he has the divine power of making friends, and he must leave it to that power to determine who his friends shall be.

B: It is enough for any man that he has the divine power of making friends, and he must leave it to that power to determine who his friends shall be.

Yes. 'it' is the replacement for the 'that' clause through a process of inversion. The meaning of the whole sentence is

The fact that a man has the divine power of making friends and that he must leave it to that (divine) power to determine who his friends shall be
is enough for any man.

CJ

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Comments  

Thank you very much!

I don't understand "is enough for any man"

Please explain easily.

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[email protected]is enough for any man

is good enough for anybody

Nobody needs more than that.
No one needs any more than that.

CJ