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A laser beam fired through a certain type of crystal can cause individual photons to be split into pairs of entangled photons. The photons can be separated by a large distance, hundreds of miles or even more. When observed, Photon A takes on an up-spin state. Entangled Photon B, though now far away, takes up a state relative to that of Photon A (in this case, a down-spin state). The transfer of state between Photon A and Photon B takes place at a speed of at least 10,000 times the speed of light, possibly even instantaneously, regardless of distance. A proposed experiment would send one photon of the entangled pair to the orbiting International Space Station, a distance of around 310 miles (500 kilometers). This would be the largest distance that has been experimentally tested.

From Astronomy Magazin.

Does the present perfect tense in that has been experimentally tested refer to the future?

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anonymousThis would be the largest distance that has been experimentally tested.

It's supposed to mean

This will be the largest distance that will have been experimentally tested.

So yes, as written, it expresses the future. And I have to say that I prefer what's written to the more precise wording with 'will have'.

CJ

Comments  
anonymousDoes the present perfect tense in that has been experimentally tested refer to the future?

Hold on a second. I have to wipe the tears of laughter out of my eyes. Yes. The poor writer got lost in a labyrinth of possibles to the point where he used the pasture improbable imperfect preconditional tense. He meant "This would be the largest distance ever to be experimentally tested."

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anonymousHe meant "This would be the largest distance ever to be experimentally tested."

I see. Thanks.

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.