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・The making of a film requires the choice of a viewpoint which controls what is shown on the screen, thus limiting our normal freedom to survey what is in front of us, to select and examine what catches our attention or interest.

If I added 'that is' or 'in other words' to the sentence above as:

The making of a film requires the choice of a viewpoint which controls what is shown on the screen, thus limiting our normal freedom to survey what is in front of us, that is/in other words, to select and examine what catches our attention or interest.
would it slightly change the message originally intended in the first sentence?
Comments  
My take

The making of a film requires the choice of a viewpoint which controls what is shown on the screen, thus limiting our normal freedom to survey what is in front of us. In other words, it needs to select and examine what catches our attention or interest.
Hi Taka,

I like it the way it is - it's like what follows that comma is a second wave of words that builds on the first. I read it as "our freedom to survey, and our freedom to select."

If you wanted to insert "in other words" it interrupts that connection, so I would add something like "our ability to...": ...our normal freedom to survey what is in front of us, or, in other words, our ability to select and..."

But again, I prefer the original phrasing.

Just my opinion.
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GG, 
So you don't really think in the original the second infinitive phrase 'to select and examine what catches our attention or interest' is put for the restatement or clarification of the first 'to survey what is in front of us'?
Oh, no, I completely think it is - it builds on that first part, but both need the part about it being limited.
 GG, could you please explain what you mean by ' both need the part about it being limited'? I'm not sure I understand what you're trying to say.
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thus limiting our normal freedom to survey what is in front of us, and

thus limiiting our normal freedom to select and examine what catches our attention or interest.

The "limits on our normal freedom" must apply to "to select and examine what catches our attention or interest."

If you interrupt where the comma is, it may not be clear that to select and examine what catches our attention or interest. is also subjected to these limits.