That is so not true.
You are so not hideous.
I've heard these from American TV anmations. In textbooks, I've seen 'isn't so' but havn't seen 'is so not'. Are these expressions correct gramatically?
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That is so not true. You are so not hideous. I've heard these from American TV anmations. In textbooks, I've seen 'isn't so' but havn't seen 'is so not'. Are these expressions correct gramatically?

I don't know which US television show introduced this syntax, but it's here. I believe it's here to stay from how I've heard it infiltrate the language.
A child does something the parent doesn't like. The parent says, "you are so not going to the movies tonight."
It's used for emphasis.
Tonight, when I change a broken electrical outlet, I will first flip the circuit breaker to cut off the power.
I am so not going to get electrocuted (to death, or otherwise). JOE
That is so not true. You are so not hideous. I've heard these from American TV anmations. In textbooks, I've seen 'isn't so' but havn't seen 'is so not'. Are these expressions correct gramatically?

Don't confuse expressions used in conversation with anything having to do with the need for grammatical construction.
In general, we think of formal and informal use. Expressions used in conversation are very informal and not always subject to the rules of grammar.
To question if a conversational informality is grammatical or not is an exercise in futility. If you find it is ungrammatical, you may find that it is still completely acceptable in the proper informal context.

Tony Cooper
Orlando, FL
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That is so not true. You are so not hideous. I've heard these from American TV anmations. In textbooks, I've seen 'isn't so' but havn't seen 'is so not'. Are these expressions correct gramatically?

It's "valley girl" speak.
That is so not true. You are so not hideous. ... havn't seen 'is so not'. Are these expressions correct gramatically?

Don't confuse expressions used in conversation with anything having to do with the need for grammatical construction. In general, we ... If you find it is ungrammatical, you may find that it is still completely acceptable in the proper informal context.

You are so the man in matters of arbitration.

John Dean
Oxford
Don't confuse expressions used in conversation with anything having to ... it is still completely acceptable in the proper informal context.

You are so the man in matters of arbitration.

I think we should appoint someone to make that decision.

Tony Cooper
Orlando, FL
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
You are so the man in matters of arbitration.

I think we should appoint someone to make that decision.

It is so decided, dude.

John Dean
Oxford
I think we should appoint someone to make that decision.

It is so decided, dude.

Decided by you, eh? So like an Englishman to tax an American with responsibility without representation from others.
Tony Cooper
Orlando, FL
Decided by you, eh? So like an Englishman to tax an American with responsibility without representation from others.

A decade or so ago my brother, who then lived in California, was visiting some friends when a canvasser called round. The host was vaguely interested in what the canvasser had to say, and so a conversation ensued. The chap asked everyone for his political affiliation, and my brother explained that he was not entitled to vote.

When the chap asked if there were any particular issues that the people wanted to raise with the candidate, some members of the group said that he felt that taxes were too high. Eventually the chap, no doubt out of politeness, asked my brother the same question. He said "no taxation without representation!"
It may well be that the English invented taxation without representation. It is a concept that the Americans have since adopted with relish.

Graeme Thomas
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