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Hello,

A. Thanks for that example and clarification.
B. Thanks for those example and clarification.
C. Thanks for that example and that clarification.

1. Which of the above sentences are correct?
2. In A, do you think 'that' before 'clarfication' is implied, thus the sentence is correct?
3. In B, I hesitate it's correct because the word 'example' right next to 'those' is singular, but 'example' and 'clarification' considered together are plural. Please advise.
4. In C, if A is correct, is it necessary to add 'that' before the word 'clarification' since 'that' is implied as follows?

Thanks for that example and (that) clarification.

I would really appreciate your help on this.
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B is wrong. A and C are right. A would be my first choice, but I might employ C if the 'example' and the 'clarification' were two completely different things and had nothing to do with each other.

CB
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Thank you.

Would you say that as long as a word is singular, we cannot use 'those' right before it even if the word 'those' follows more than one objects?

eg.

those bacon and egg
those dog, cat, and mice
those rich, poor, and middle class

Are all above incorrect and all should be 'that'?
AnonymousWould you say that as long as a word is singular, we cannot use 'those' right before it even if the word 'those' follows more than one objects?
That + singular, those + plural is a good rule.

CB
OK, thank you for the rule.

Can I say 'those rich' like the 'the rich' when taken as plural?
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AnonymousThanks for those example and clarification.
No.

You are trying to extend the scope of "those" over several nouns.
*those [example and clarification]

It can't be done. It's wrong.
The scope of these and those is limited to one noun.
[that example] and clarification
[those examples] and clarifications

CJ
Thanks, CJ, for explaining further. It's clearer to me now.

What about 'those rich'? Does it sound natural? To my ears, it's not, but the grammar rule doesn't make it incorrect. I'm not sure about this, though.
AnonymousDoes it sound natural?
those rich is not natural. No.

When you promote the adjective rich (or poor) to noun status, you don't use demonstratives (this, that, these, those) -- just the: the rich, the poor. This refers to all rich (or poor) people. But if you want to specify a particular group, you have to add people. these rich people, those poor people.

CJ
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Ah. That makes perfect sense to me now.

Thank you very much for that clarification.