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In 1922 Hemingway settled in Paris ---- .

A) that he wrote stories and novels about the Americans living there just as Henry James had done
B) where he moved in a circle of American expatriates that included Ezra Pound and Scott Fitzgerald

Hi,

I think B is the correct answer, but I wonder whether A is correct too. Can "that" be used to mean "in which"? By the way, there is no comma after "Paris".
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Comments  
A) doesn't work. "that he wrote stories and novels about" could conceivable mean he wrote them about Paris. But unfortunately you need "about" to say he wrote about the Americans. It can't do both.

B) is good.
In 1922 Hemingway settled in Paris -- .

A) that he wrote stories and novels about the Americans living there just as Henry James had done

Would the sentence be correct without "the Americans"?
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You could say this: In 1922 Hemingway settled in Paris -- .

A) which he wrote stories and novels about, just as Henry James had done.

As you can see, it requires quite a few modifications to make that work.
Why doesn't it work with "that"?
TrexCan "that" be used to mean "in which"?
No.
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Trex Can "that" be used to mean "in which"?
I wonder if you mean "Can "that" be used to mean "which"?
Grammar Geek A) which he wrote stories and novels about, just as Henry James had done.
TrexWhy doesn't it work with "that"?
It may not be great style, but as far as I know, it would be okay to use "that" in the version of (A) you're trying to reconstruct, such as, "The Paris [that] he wrote about is not the Paris I saw in 1942."

I guess it would sound worse in GG's version:
In 1922 Hemingway settled in Paris -- , which (that) he wrote stories and novels about, just as Henry James had done.

It would probably be incorrect.

Edit. Trex, I think you can see that when you blanked out "Americans" in your earlier post, you should have blanked out "Americans living there," (for starters).

Hi Avangi
Avangi"The Paris [that] he wrote about is not the Paris I saw in 1942."
In that sentence, "that he wrote about" is a defining clause, and you definitely would not set it off with commas. That sentence also contains a specialized use of "the". The vast majority of the time, you would not use "the" with the proper name of a city. It is the addition of the word "the" that makes a defining clause necessary.
AvangiIn 1922 Hemingway settled in Paris -- , which (that) he wrote stories and novels about, just as Henry James had done.
Sorry, but the word "that" sounds just awful to me in that sentence.
In that sentence, "which he wrote stories and novels about" is non-defining. Everything after the dash is extra information.

EDIT:
I would also not use a comma after a dash. One or the other, but not both.
Thanks, Amy, I was struggling with that, as you may have suspected.

The comma was sort of sentimental. The OP had double dash, period as the way the example had been set up, followed by the two choices. I saw it as a comma, and later saw his alert that there was no comma. It sort of trailed us through the thread.
Edit. It sounded awful to me too!
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