+0
I just don't like that sentence.............. can you tell me what's wrong with it?

I"m sure something is wrong but I can't put my foot down on it. Tell me how I can say that

as well thanx ^^
Comments  
Hello JK

'the guys' seems to want to lead to more information about who they were.

So maybe you could say, if they've already been referred to:

1. That would've gotten rid of those guys.

If not, you could define them:

2. That would've gotten rid of the guys [in the bar. But what about the ones in the back room?]

MrP
Could we say:
"That would've gotten us/me etc rid of the guys"?
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
'That would've gotten rid of the guys'

I just don't like that sentence.............. can you tell me what's wrong with it?

I'm sure something is wrong but I can't put my finger [foot down] on it.

Tell me how I can say that as well thanx ^^



The sentence is fine, JK. Obviously, there is some prior context here as there is in all language.

A: I could have turned on Oprah.

B: That would've gotten rid of the guys.

{Note the change I made to the idiom above (in bold)}

Pieanne asked: Could we say:
"That would've gotten us/me etc rid of the guys"?

Yes, you could say it that way, Pieanne.
Thanks, JTT!
With JTT, I don't really find anything wrong with it-- is it perhaps just the extreme colloquialness of the style that bothers you, JK?
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
It British English, you would write "That would've got rid of the guys" , assuming you're British or from a British Commenweatlh country, ie English speaking and not US or Ireland. Then this may be what you think is wrong. Otherwise, according to American English it's correct.