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Does "all folks" mean "all down to earth"?

Context:

That's not all folks.

If the consensus view of Wednesday's Bank of England policy minutes is anything to go by, Britain's central bank has turned even more dovish, U.K. interest rates have just about peaked and the pound has only one way to go - down.

'We expect sterling to lose 10% in trade-weighted terms,' predicted Hans Redeker, currency strategist with BNP Paribas in London.
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Comments  
This may be an expression exclusive to British English.
I can only tell you what it means to an American.

Years ago, there used to be animated cartoons presented at the movies before the feature film was shown. At the end of some of these there was a cartoon character who said, in a very happy, silly voice, "That's all, folks!" (i.e., "This entertainment is finished, ladies and gentlemen!") This was always the signal that the cartoon was finished.

If this is the reference, then "That's not all folks" (which should contain a comma, really), means "The course of action/event/entertainment is not yet finished, people!"

We need to be careful not to jump to conclusions, though. The expression may mean something completely different in BrEng.
I will have this explantion confirmed by a native Briton.
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Jobb,

CalifJim is correct, as per usual.

If you read the comments in the text that follows, you get the impression that the UK economy is weak, hence the Central Bank is dovish and the rates have peaked. (High rates slow an economy; low rates encourage economic growth.) One way to help "recharge" an economy is to lower the country's currency. So, you could almost imagine the following scenario.

This will happen and that will happen. Our economy is poor and we need to do this and we need to do that.

That's not all folks. (as if to say, "and wait everyone, there's more...")

If the consensus view of Wednesday's Bank of England policy minutes is anything to go by, Britain's central bank has turned even more dovish, U.K. interest rates have just about peaked and the pound has only one way to go - down.

'We expect sterling to lose 10% in trade-weighted terms,' predicted Hans Redeker, currency strategist with BNP Paribas in London.

Hope that helps.

MountainHiker
Speaking of which...
I understood "folks" as friends but can you use "folks" to refer to your parents ? ( I think that's American English)
thanks
'That's all folks' just means 'people' or 'group of people' to me, not particularly friends. It is a word I'm not sure is really British, I think we have adopted it from America. It is also quite common now, among younger people anyway, to refer to parents as folks in Britain.
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I think I basically got it.
Considering that English is a Germanic language and German has "Volk" (as in "Volkswagen"), I suspect the British had the word long before the U.S. ever existed (although not necessarily with the additional meaning "parents")! Emotion: smile
See:
[url="http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=7808&sid=fd8ac304eac512cdf78bc1dbbfdafb31"][/url]
that the person asked exactly the same question as here.
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