"That's not the way we talk" is the headline above an article printed on today's Guardian (British newspaper), reprinted from the LA Times. See the original at
http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/commentary/la-oe-kenny22mar22,0,2
498777.story?coll=la-news-comment-opinions

The author complains about the way British English is influencing American English. Targets include "send up", "spot on", "sacked", and "queue up". But he saves most of his indignation for "went missing".

The headline-writers at The Guardian wrote "It's ruining the language", which seems to exaggerate the professor's position on the matter, perhaps in a lame attempt to swell the post bag.

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
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"That's not the way we talk" is the headline above an article printed on today's Guardian (British newspaper), ... which seems to exaggerate the professor's position on the matter, perhaps in a lame attempt to swell the post bag.

Goose, gander, sauce.
Ida "Goose"-Johnson
"That's not the way we talk" is the headline above an article printed on today's Guardian (British newspaper), ... which seems to exaggerate the professor's position on the matter, perhaps in a lame attempt to swell the post bag.

Brilliant. Perhaps The Guardian could start a letter-writing campaign straightaway to introduce Americans living outside the Northeast to superior British expressions.
Best regards,
Spehro Pefhany

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"That's not the way we talk" is the headline above an article printed on today's Guardian (British newspaper), reprinted from the LA Times. See the original at http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/commentary/la-oe-kenny22mar22,0,2 498777.story?coll=la-news-comment-opinions

(That's not clickable for me, because of the middle indent. I offer this, which may not work either:)

498777.story?coll=la-news-comment-opinions
The author complains about the way British English is influencing American English. Targets include "send up", "spot on", "sacked", and ... which seems to exaggerate the professor's position on the matter, perhaps in a lame attempt to swell the post bag.

Yeah, and I'd even say that to use the words "complains" and "indignation" is a bit of overstatement, too. I don't see the kind of frenzied emotion that is common to US feature articles. It seems pretty low-key and supplies considerable detail in the figures.

It's an interesting topic; all of my life, I've been aware of a strong cultural reluctance on the part of Americans to adopt British slang and sayings. So when the odd useful one comes along, I feel like I'm almost betraying my country by saying it, besides sounding pompous and all that. Of those mentioned, "spot on" is the only one I can remember being tempted to say, and I don't remember if I gave in.

Best Donna Richoux
"That's not the way we talk" is the headline above ... perhaps in a lame attempt to swell the post bag.

Brilliant. Perhaps The Guardian could start a letter-writing campaign straightaway to introduce Americans living outside the Northeast to superior British expressions.

Hey, yeah! I know some people in Ohio who would just love to be told how to talk betterly.
"That's not the way we talk" is the headline above an article printed on today's Guardian (British newspaper), ... which seems to exaggerate the professor's position on the matter, perhaps in a lame attempt to swell the post bag.

It might've been better if Mr Kenny had betrayed** even the merest hint of irony in his musings.
His statistic-quoting, fact-checking article is the kind of "journalism" that makes so many American non-fiction books so turgid to read.

**I hope you'll agree that I've used "betray" more appropriately than Mr K did.
Adrian
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Brilliant. Perhaps The Guardian could start a letter-writing campaign straightaway to introduce Americans living outside the Northeast to superior British expressions.

Hey, yeah! I know some people in Ohio who would just love to be told how to talk betterly.

Well they certainly responded to the campaign to get them to vote betterly (or am I stating the obvious?)!
Ida Goode-Johnson
Possibly, but nowhere does he speak positively, and he does say:

"...a virus that's infecting American media..."
"...betraying perfectly good American idioms..."
"...avoiding the perfectly good American..."
"...that's not the way we talk in this country..."
It's an interesting topic; all of my life, I've been aware of a strong cultural reluctance on the part ... one comes along, I feel like I'm almost betraying my country by saying it, besides sounding pompous and all that.

Is it just Britishisms that meet such resistance? Are there enough Canadianisms, Australianisms, etc, to judge?

Mike Barnes
Cheshire, England
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