+1

As far as I know, "the + adjective" form is used to refer to the people or things belonging to the adjective group as in "The poor have many concerns", but can we say just "the poor" to refer to only one poor person? as in "The poor is there"?

+2

I don't believe so. When poor is used as a noun, it is a plural noun. See Cambridge Dictionary: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/poor

She gives a lot of money to the poor.

You can say, however, the following: The poor person is there.

In this instance, poor is used as an adjective.

+2
fire1but can we say just "the poor" to refer to only one poor person?

Impossible.

CJ

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CalifJim
fire1but can we say just "the poor" to refer to only one poor person?

Impossible.

CJ

But isn't "the accused" used to refer to only one person who is accused or the people who are accused?

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fire1But isn't "the accused" used to refer to only one person who is accused or the people who are accused?

Yes. Go figure.

CJ

fire1But isn't "the accused" used to refer to only one person who is accused or the people who are accused?

There is another one: The deceased was/were buried.

A singular verb is required if the reference is to something abstract: The impossible has always interested him.

(Impossible things have always interested him.)

CB