A poster whose name doesn't matter has questioned my statement that "scholarly" is an adverb, and my advice "see any good dictionary". That poster has also seemed to imply that the adverb "scholarly" is not to be found in most dictionaries.
I find the adverb "scholarly" in
The American Heritage Dictionary 3rd Edition
Webster's Third New International Dictionary
The New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary
The Cambridge Dictionary 1993 edition
Random House Webster's Unabridged Dictionary
Random House Webster's College Dictionary
2nd edition
The Thorndike-Barnhart Dictionary (World Book
edition 1963)
Webster's New International Dictionary Second
Edition
The Oxford English Dictionary
Webster's New International Dictionary

1913 edition

Two of the British dictionaries tag the adverb "scholarly" "rare", but I never said it wasn't rare.
The same poster whose name doesn't matter has correctly deduced that my playful abbreviation "SAGD" stood for "see any good dictionary". Let me now define "good dictionary":

good dictionary - one that agrees with me
I have a small number of dictionaries that do not show "scholarly" as an adverb. They are by definition, at least for the purpose of this discussion, not good dictionaries.

Logic might dictate that from the adjective "scholarly" we form the adverb *"scholarlily". This is only one case in English where the "-lily" form has been eschewed in favor of simply making the adjective also an adverb.
I'm curious to know what single word equivalent of "in a scholarly manner" would be used by the lexicographers who have seen fit to exclude the adverb "scholarly" from their dictionaries.
1 2
"Bob Cunningham" (Email Removed) schreef in bericht
A poster whose name doesn't matter has questioned my statement that "scholarly" is an adverb, and my advice "see any good dictionary". That poster has also seemed to imply that the adverb "scholarly" is not to be found in most dictionaries.

On "scholarly" Google produces 2.600.000 hits and only 6 for 'scholarlily'

Cheers
Tedfriet EFL teacher (retired)
snip
Logic might dictate that from the adjective "scholarly" we form the adverb *"scholarlily". This is only one case in English ... scholarly manner" would be used by the lexicographers who have seen fit to exclude the adverb "scholarly" from their dictionaries.

Your question appears to me to be based on the false assumption that all adverbial descriptive phrases must have a single word equivalent.

I don't think there's any law of nature or language that demands that state of affairs.

Cheers, Harvey
Ottawa/Toronto/Edmonton for 30 years;
Southern England for the past 22 years.
(for e-mail, change harvey.news to harvey.van)
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On 07 Sep 2004, Bob Cunningham wrote snip

Logic might dictate that from the adjective "scholarly" we form ... seen fit to exclude the adverb "scholarly" from their dictionaries.

Your question appears to me to be based on the false assumption that all adverbial descriptive phrases must have a single word equivalent.

There is insufficient basis for that inference in what I said. Minimizing word count is always a worthwhile aim, but nothing says you have to do it.
But if I wanted to promote the avoidance of a single-word expression, I wouldn't feel right about coming up with nothing better than a multiple-word substitute.
By the way, I'm okay with using "scholarly" as an adverb, but I don't feel the same about the adverb "friendly", even though dictionaries say it exists and means "in a friendly manner". Can anyone cite an example of its use in print in modern times?
On "scholarly" Google produces 2.600.000 hits

That's not useful data because there's no breakdown between use of "scholarly" as an adjective and as an adverb. It's conceivable that only five of the hits were adverbs.
and only 6 for 'scholarlily'

There we need to know how many of the six had humorous intent. It wouldn't surprise me to learn that all of them did.
By the way, I'm okay with using "scholarly" as an adverb,

How, may I ask? Like this? "He wrote scholarly."
but I don't feel the same about the adverb "friendly", even though dictionaries say it exists and means "in a friendly manner". Can anyone cite an example of its use in print in modern times?

Are road signs, "print"?
http://lumumba.luc.ac.be/~xon/baylor%202003/Part2/images/texas,%20drive% 20friendly jpg jpg.jpg
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By the way, I'm okay with using "scholarly" as an adverb,

How, may I ask? Like this? "He wrote scholarly."

I meant I'm not uncomfortable with others using it. I might not ever use it myself.
From the online Oxford English Dictionary :
scholarly, adv.
rare.
As befits a scholar.

1598 SHAKES. Merry W. I. iii. 2 What saies my BullyRooke? speake schollerly, and wisely.

1868 Contemp. Rev. IX. 287 The revision is carefullyand scholarly done.

1903 KIPLING Five Nations 50 We shall harness horses(Death's own pale horses) and scholarly plough the sands.
but I don't feel the same about the adverb "friendly", ... an example of its use in print in modern times?

Are road signs, "print"? http://lumumba.luc.ac.be/~xon/baylor%202003/Part2/images/texas,%20drive% 20friendly jpg jpg.jpg

( http://tinyurl.com/5lbs3 ).
Close enough, but that use of "friendly" is in my humble opinion an adjective rather than an adverb, with "drive" being effectively a copulative verb. The usage is akin to that of "close" as in "I won't be right at that park, but I'll be (or drive) close".
Safety poster: [/nq]
Same.
Interesting, though. Thanks.
} A poster whose name doesn't matter
That'd be me. Let's stand up like a man, Elwood, and respond in the same thread where something is rightly suggested, instead of starting a whole new thread with your skewed version of things. I hate to shame you by correcting so many of the errors you made in this posting, but I'll try to give you credit where you deserve it.
} has questioned my } statement that "scholarly" is an adverb,
I didn't do that, as you well know and should admit publicly, right here in this thread. I said you were right about at least one dictionary mentioning "scholarly" as an adverb, and I named the dictionary (NSOED93), but I also pointed it out that it called it " rare " and that it dated it to the 16th century. I did suggest that you were stretching the word "is" to the breaking point to imply that any good dictionary had "scholarly" as an adverb.
} and my advice "see } any good dictionary".
As if to imply that any good dictionary supposted you. I named four dictionaries commonly cited in alt.usage.english that did not support you, which I declare is sufficient counterexample to your "see any good dictionary".
I do have to give you credit here for not tring to wriggle out of my expansion of your more than obvious "SAGD" (and presumably your "TMWFI", passed over here). That would have been a childish thing to do, but you didn't.
} That poster has also seemed to imply } that the adverb "scholarly" is not to be found in most } dictionaries.
Seemed to imply? You are dreaming, sir. I named four where it didn't appear and one where it only barely appeared. I said nothing about most dictionaries, but I can, if you want make a statement about most dictionaries in this room. In the other room I may have more dictionaries than you'd want to carry around, but I suspect that the results of looking in them wouldn't be startling. There was a time when it was so used. Dictionaries that keep track of such things may well have it.

} I find the adverb "scholarly" in
}
} The American Heritage Dictionary 3rd Edition

Really, Elwood? Really? I have my copy of that one right here, and it doesn't mention "adv" with respect to "scholarly". Not a hint of it. Was that a lie or just a mistake, or can someone else confirm that some printing of AHD3 has "scholarly" as an adverb? Elwood's credibility just took off out the window in my book. He's got 24 hours to claim the blurry-vision excuse.
} Webster's Third New International Dictionary

Could be. I won't bother to check just now.
} The New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary
Marked " rare " with a century when it was used. But I told you that.

} The Cambridge Dictionary 1993 edition
} Random House Webster's Unabridged Dictionary } Random House Webster's College Dictionary
} 2nd edition
} The Thorndike-Barnhart Dictionary (World Book } edition 1963)
} Webster's New International Dictionary Second } Edition
} The Oxford English Dictionary
I haven't checked those that I have, but I wouldn't expect more than one blatant error in a list that long, and it looks like I found it right off.

} Webster's New International Dictionary
} 1913 edition
Scraping the bottom with that last. I gave my copy away before I read your first posting in alt.usage.english. Websters Second would be the one that carries weight with me. If the rest make you happy, I don't mind.

} Two of the British dictionaries tag the adverb "scholarly" } "rare", but I never said it wasn't rare.
No, but *I* said that it was.
} The same poster whose name doesn't matter has correctly } deduced that my playful abbreviation "SAGD" stood for "see } any good dictionary". Let me now define "good dictionary": }
} good dictionary - one that agrees with me
Ah. Like AHD3? Does it really?
But humo(u)r is good. I've liked that in you for some ten years now of reading your postings. It's not the greatest form of argumentation, but it could be worse.
Better to admit when you are wrong. Worse to start a new thread and make it hard for people to back up a posting.
} I have a small number of dictionaries that do not show } "scholarly" as an adverb. They are by definition, at least } for the purpose of this discussion, not good dictionaries.

Squirm, squirm, sugar baby. Had you posted it in the same thread, I would have been more impressed. I get the impression that your idea of "argument" is mere contradicting, and that you feel you have gone the extra mile when you find in your bookpile a few citations that you can convince yourself that they agree with you.
} Logic might dictate that from the adjective "scholarly" we } form the adverb *"scholarlily". This is only one case in } English where the "-lily" form has been eschewed in favor of } simply making the adjective also an adverb.
Could be that the "-lily" form is more modern than the 16th-century usage your lexicographers found.
Let's give you credit here for making English-usage points.

} I'm curious to know what single word equivalent of "in a } scholarly manner" would be used by the lexicographers who } have seen fit to exclude the adverb "scholarly" from their } dictionaries.
Why limit them to a single word, when everyone is familiar with the form "more scholarly"? They'd use "more scholarly". Do you seriously doubt it?

R. J. Valentine
(a lot of things that were not surprising, coming from him)

I won't bother to respond in detail to Valentine's tiresome abuse, but I will say that my copy of The American Heritage Dictionary Third Edition ( AHD3 ) does indeed show "scholarly" as an adverb.
It's well known that at least one publisher makes
modifications in successive printings of dictionaries without changing the title or the edition number. I know from experience that that's clearly true of Merriam-Webster; I have no reason to think it's not true of American Heritage. So I'm willing to grant that Valentine is probably not lying when he says "scholarly adv." is not in his printing of AHD3 .
I'm using a crippled system at present. Among other things, I can't scan pages and I can't upload anything to my Web site. I'm tentatively planning to buy a new computer and start afresh. If that happens, I'll scan the page in AHD3 where it says "scholarly adv." and post it at my Web site. This will be for anyone who wants to see for certain that Valentine is wrong when he says I'm mistaken about it. It won't be particularly for Valentine to look at: I don't care whether he sees it or not.
Beyond that despite Valentine's scurrilous remarks all I'll say is that I made no errors and no misrepresentations in the posting in this thread to which Valentine has responded.
Okay, I guess I could add that if I were much interested in Valentine's view of anything, I would probably be
disappointed in his failure to see the humor in my remarks about good dictionaries and what a good dictionary is. But I'm not much interested in Valentine's view of anything.
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