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Native English words do not have nasals before /f/ or /v/, of course (fimf > five etc.)

Correction: "did" not... until the invention of
toilet paper (how do pronounce "bumf"?)
Native English words do not have nasals before /f/ or /v/, of course (fimf > five etc.)

Correction: "did" not... until the invention of toilet paper (how do pronounce "bumf"?)

What do you make of non-new words like "triumph", "lymph", and "nymph"? (Newer additions to English include "harrumph", "galumph", and "oomph".)
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Native English words do not have nasals before /f/ or /v/, of course (fimf > five etc.)

Correction: "did" not... until the invention of toilet paper (how do pronounce "bumf"?)

? Is that something Australian?

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
'toilet paper', later 'written matter of little value, stupid paperwork'. Also spelled .
Brian
Correction: "did" not... until the invention of toilet paper (how do pronounce "bumf"?)

What do you make of non-new words like "triumph", "lymph", and "nymph"? (Newer additions to English include "harrumph", "galumph", and "oomph".)

They could get p's, being tautosyllabic.

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Originally British, I believe: from 'toilet paper', later 'written matter of little value, stupid paperwork'. Also spelled .

Yes, British. I first heard it in a British TV series. It might have been "Yes, Minister".
What do you make of non-new words like "triumph", "lymph", and "nymph"?

"Native English words" Miguel Carrasquer specified. Those are from Greek.
(Newer additions to English include "harrumph", "galumph", and "oomph".)

Onomatopoeia. They have a disturbing habit of not abiding by the phonotactics of the language they inhabit.