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Okay, does anyone know whether "dog" is /dOg/ in Britain, ... or were they pronounced with /O/? They are for me.

dog /dOg/ cloth /klOT/ or /klO:T/ long /lON/ strong /strON/ (from memory, and confirmed from by dictionary). Nothing renegade of ... like this everywhere in the world except maybe the US and Canada. What else than this could the pronunciation be?

What would you think would be different, where in the US or Canada?

Except there is no /:/, of course.

Peter T. Daniels (Email Removed)
(Bob Cunningham said:)
(O) is open mid and (A.) is open. There's no ... and that that vowel is midway between (O) and (A.).

Sparky, is this not a retreat from your long-held position that any pronounced vowel is absolutely classifiable as either one ... which may be faulty, is that you once contended that a vowel could not be "between", say, (A.) and (O).

Your recollection is quite faulty. I have always thought that the IPA symbols represent regions in the vowel quadrilateral, and that a sound should be represented by the symbol corresponding to whichever region it's closest to. A sound that's near the boundary between two regions could be represented by the symbol corresponding to either of the two regions. A given writer would be expected to think that a sound that's about midway is closer to one region than to another, but another writer could easily think conversely.

I've more than once opined that the vowel quadrilateral should be thought of as a continuum in at least two dimensions, open-close and front-back. I also find it satisfying to think of there being a continuum in a third dimension, rounding.
I came across an intriguing situation with regard to Ladefoged's illustrative pronunciations of (E) and (&} at his (then) Web site. His two sounds have essentially identical first, second, and third formant frequencies, but they sound clearly different. I discovered that the difference was produced by a difference in the amplitude of the third formant. There's a discussion of my analysis, with plots of comparative formants, spectra, and
spectrograms, at http://alt-usage-english.org/six plots.html ,
Incidentally, I've tried to think of a pair to illustrate ... (sO:t), respectively, in NSOED . What are some others?

sot sought cot caught don dawn bot bought brat(wurst) brought dotter daughter

All homophones in my idiolect.
I've thought of most of them in the past; I don't know why it seemed so hard this time.
I might add "dodder daughter".
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Fri, 05 Nov 2004 00:41:08 GMT: "Peter T. Daniels"
(Email Removed): in sci.lang:
dog /dOg/ cloth /klOT/ or /klO:T/ long /lON/ strong /strON/ ... and Canada. What else than this could the pronunciation be?

What would you think would be different, where in the US or Canada?

I don't know, I can't read the discussion, because it is written in riddle-transcription. I can mysteriously understand spoken American English, but from what I often read here, its pronunciation seems to be completely alien in comparison to the English I learnt in school and hear on BBC World.
Except there is no /:/, of course.

All American vowels are llaahhhng, I know. And nasalised, and veeerrryy looww and in a creaky voice.

Ruud Harmsen - http://rudhar.com
The /t/-pronounced version is a spelling pronunciation in American English. I expect that further research will show that it is ... the /t/ (compare "soften") and the spelling pronunciation arose sometime in the late 19th century or the early 20th century.

More likely that the t-less version is the more modern and probably came from the aristocracy's habit, at one time, of leavin' out letters.
Rob Bannister
I've noticed that some people pronounce the 'l' in 'almond'. Guess that's either a sixth set or a special case..

It is simply a spelling pronunciation. Other people pronounce the /t/ in "often". Go figure. Polik.

Stewart.

One thinks of the song "Merry Widow Waltz", which enforces this

"Lovers often
Hum this soft and
Sweet Refrain."
Jack
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Bob Cunningham filted:

In 1942, shortly after I arrived at the U.S. Maritime ... man who told me to see him was a Bostonian.

My own best experience with misheard names was trying to find a woman named "Benchman" and discovering she was actually "Benjamin".. Not a patch on a high-school friend of mine who was introduced to Mr Wilmuth and called him "Mr Woman"..r

Years ago on vacation, my father came out of a Miami Beach drugstore laughing. A little old man had been at the counter asking for "Ben Gay" (1) The clerk handed him a tube of Ben Gay which the old man pushed back and repeated his demand for Ben Gay. The exchange went on for some time until the man finally got what he wanted: band-aids.

(1) a topical ointment for aching muscles.
The same poem rhymes: slanted, enchanted, haunted forced, burst ever, river far, war dulcimer, saw, Abora Poets have funny notions about what makes a rhyme.

Especially when stoned.

Steve Hayes from Tshwane, South Africa
http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7734/stevesig.htm
E-mail - see web page, or parse: shayes at dunelm full stop org full stop uk
Indeed there are. But it is also found throughout the ... the ring of suburbs surrounding Detroit rather than Detroit Proper).

These discussions always puzzle me. I lived in Chicago for a number of years, and I just can't imagine how ... I never slept on a cot, and never asked anyone if they had a spare cot around to crash on.

I slept on a cot in the Boy Scouts and in the Army last time in early '59.

dg (domain=ccwebster)
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The same poem rhymes: slanted, enchanted, haunted forced, burst ever, river far, war dulcimer, saw, Abora Poets have funny notions about what makes a rhyme.

Especially when stoned.

I think those are called slant rhymes.

dg (domain=ccwebster)
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